äÄöÖüÜß
Lautschrift
Deutsch
Monophthonge
ɛɪɔɶøʏ
Diphthonge
au̯ai̯ɔʏ̯
Konsonantensystem
çʤŋʃʀʁʒ
Englisch
Monophthonge
ɛɜɪɔʊəɑɐɒæ
Konsonantensystem
ŋθʃʒçʍɹɻɫɾ
Diakritische Zeichen
ˈː
 
NEU
leo-ende

TopicGerman speakers substituting W for V in spoken English148 replies    
Comment
Can anyone account for the tendency of some German speakers to substitute W for V in English: "I am wery tired" instead of "I am very tired" ?

It's easy to understand the opposite substitution: The old stereotyped German accent from old movies (with some basis in reality) would say "Ve vill go now" instead of "we will go now". That can be explained perhaps because of the lack of the English W sound in German, and the fact that the German W is pronounced like English V.

But what explains the opposite substitution? German has no English W sound, at least in standard Hochdeutsch. Could it be over-correction? In other words, a speaker knows that he/she has to make an effort to introduce the unfamiliar W sound, and so introduces it in contexts where it doesn't belong?

Or maybe the English W sound does in fact appear in some regional accents in German. I'm not sufficiently familiar with the range of German accents, so this might be a common phenomenon that I just don't know about.

I think that this also appears with some native speakers of other languages. For example, I think I've heard it with Dutch speakers speaking English.

I think it may be more common among older people, who grew up and learned English at an earlier time.

This is something I've always wondered about, but never had a good theory to explain it. Thanks for any thoughts on this issue.
Authoreric (new york) (63613) 15 Jan 11, 00:59
Comment
I think it is indeed a case of over-correction. In German, v and w can sound the same, think of 'Vase' and 'Wagen'. So when German speakers learn the 'w' sound, it's often applied to both letters. The same tends to happen to the continuous form; once taught, it gets used all the time, even though there is no corresponding tense in German.

#1AuthorGibson (418762) 15 Jan 11, 01:38
Comment
Can anyone account for the tendency of some German speakers to substitute W for V in English: "I am wery tired" instead of "I am very tired" ?

It's easy to understand the opposite substitution: The old stereotyped German accent from old movies (...) That can be explained perhaps because of the lack of the English W sound in German, and the fact that the German W is pronounced like English V.

But what explains the opposite substitution?


Im Scheibenwelt-(Discworld-)Roman "Going Postal" heißt die Hauptfigur "Moist von Lipwig". Warum spricht Adora den Namen "wonn Lipwig" aus?

Tja. Kann es sein, dass Briten mit dem deutschen V ebensolche Probleme haben wie umgekehrt die Deutschen mit dem britischen V?

Na, sowas aber auch ...

Man könnte fast glauben, dass es sich um Fremdsprachen handelt. ;-)


Nix für ungut, Eric. Aber ich glaube, das sind einfach Sachen, die passieren, wenn man eine "Fremdsprache" spricht. Ich sehe da keine over-correction, sondern einfach ein Problem, das sich aus der unterschiedlichen Laut-Kombination der Sprachen ergibt.


Falls du erlaubst, frage ich auch was: Warum haben Englischsprecher Probleme mit dem "ü"? Ich kann dir einen Song nennen, in dem die Worte "... have you notized?" vorkommen. Der (britische) Sänger singt eindeutig "notüsd"! Wieso ist also ausgerechnet das "ü" so schwer?

Na?
#2AuthorIgelin DE (467049) 15 Jan 11, 05:51
Comment
#0 wrote: German has no English W sound, at least in standard Hochdeutsch.

Dictionary: ouijaboard

I think that's pronounced with a W sound, in German. I'm trying to think of other some other examples. I agree with Igelin, it's not overcorrection. Just the way we perceive sounds, and actually the way we feel they should be pronounced in a different language. Yiddish comes into play here.

It's not an accident that V and W are next to each other in the alphabet. ^^ and a ;-)
Also, some people don't hear the phonetic difference. I'm sure that there are numerous dissertations on this subject.

Eric, Can you provide some more examples of what you are addressing, in both languages?
#3Authoropine (680211) 15 Jan 11, 06:47
Comment
@Igelin DE: Warum haben Englischsprecher Probleme mit dem "ü"?

I think simply because that sound doesn't exist in English. (It's like the difficulty many non-English speakers have with the English TH sound - it doesn't exist in German, or French, Italian, or . . . )

Der (britische) Sänger singt eindeutig "notüsd"!

It's hard to imagine how this would sound. The Ü sound does not exist in standard English.

@opine: Just the way we perceive sounds, and actually the way we feel they should be pronounced in a different language.

I think that there are reasons for specific sound shifts, and reasons for accents in different languages. "That's just the way it is" doesn't explain anything. We can do better.
#4Authoreric (new york) (63613) 15 Jan 11, 07:03
Comment
What are some more examples? And if you find this "reason" which may indeed exist. I'll be reading. Sometimes it is the way it is. Even in Germany, W and V can vary according to dialect.
#5Authoropine (680211) 15 Jan 11, 07:05
Comment
What are some more examples?

I don't understand what you're asking. Any English word with an initial V sound is an example. Any dictionary has thousands of examples, listed under V.

The reason for sound substitution in a non-native language is usually that the target sound does not exist in the speaker's native language, so that the speaker substitutes a sound which he knows from his native language, which is similar to the target sound. That explains why a German might say "ve will go" instead of "we will go". (The V sound does exist in standard German, while the W sound doesn't.) But it doesn't explain why a German might say "I am wery tired" instead of "I am very tired".
#6Authoreric (new york) (63613) 15 Jan 11, 07:29
Comment
Eric, very or wery?

To me I don't see any difference, and when I click on the hearing button in LEO for very I don't hear any difference, so maybe I'll never be able to learn to speak it better!

So my theory in answering your question is:
Who cannot hear the difference, will not learn to speak it.

Edit: But perhaps I speak it correctly, like the wh in when.
#7Authorad.joe (236303) 15 Jan 11, 07:50
Comment
Could it be over-correction? In other words, a speaker knows that he/she has to make an effort to introduce the unfamiliar W sound, and so introduces it in contexts where it doesn't belong?

Ich glaube auch, dass Hyperkorrektur die Lösung ist. In meinem Schulunterricht wurde sehr viel Wert auf die richtige Aussprache des englischen "w" gelegt und immer wieder betont, wie falsch es klingen würde, "vater" statt "water" zu sagen.

Ich denke, dass das dann oft unbewusst auf Wörter übetragen wird, die im Englischen tatsächlich mit "v" beginnen (vase, very). Besonders kompliziert wird es, wenn das Wort noch einen weiteren "schwierigen" Laut (z.B. das "r" in "very") enthält.

it may be more common among older people, who grew up and learned English at an earlier time.

Das mag sein, wobei ich die Ausspracheprobleme mancher älterer Leute, die die Sprache nur im Schulunterricht gelernt haben und keinen weiteren Kontakt zu englischen Muttersprachlern/Filmen o.Ä. gehabt haben, eher mit dem stereotypischen "Drink ziss vater" assoziieren würde.

Ich gehöre der jüngeren Generation an und habe diesen Fehler ("wery good") unbewusst auch lange Zeit gemacht. Ich habe zwar mittlerweile versucht, ihn mir abzugewöhnen, aber das ist leider nicht so einfach. :-(
#8AuthorNicki (DE) (616721) 15 Jan 11, 09:49
Comment
Ich stimme Gibson und Nicki zu. Es ist vielen halbgut Englisch sprechenden Deutschen nicht klar, dass es im Englischen einen Ausspracheunterschied zwischen v und w gibt.
#9AuthorEl Buitre (266981) 15 Jan 11, 09:57
Comment
Siehe auch diese älteren Fäden zum Thema:

related discussion: pronunciation of English "v"

related discussion: Why do German Speakers pronounce "V" at beginning of ...

related discussion: Germans' use of intrusive Rs

(ab #4)

Edit: Lustig, der deutsche Wikpedia-Eintrag nennt genau dieses Problem als Beispiel für Hyperkorrektur beim Fremdsprachenlernen. (Ja, ich weiß, Wikipedia ist für linguistische Fragen nicht unbedingt die beste Anlaufstelle).

Hyperkorrektur kann auch beim Erlernen einer Fremdsprache auftreten. Der Laut [w] (Labialisierter stimmhafter velarer Approximant) kommt im Deutschen nicht vor und wird häufig von deutschen Englischlernern durch [v] (wie im deutschen Winter) wiedergegeben. Es kommt vor, dass sich Sprecher dessen bewusst sind und, beim Versuch ihre Aussprache zu korrigieren, auch dort [w] sprechen, wo das Englische eigentlich ein [v] verlangt (z.B. in victim, valley, Vancouver).

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperkorrektur#Beispiele
#10AuthorNicki (DE) (616721) 15 Jan 11, 10:10
Comment
OT @ Igelin: You would have enjoyed our - infrequent and very brief - German conversation sessions at school. As teenagers, we put a lot of effort into coming up with sentences that contained no words with those embarrassing* umlauts. ;-)

*embarrassing because our mouths just wouldn't work that way.
#11AuthorSD3 (451227) 15 Jan 11, 14:13
Comment
Thanks to all for your thoughts. Apparently the consensus is that hypercorrection is apparently the right explanation.

What about my second hypothesis? Or maybe the English W sound does in fact appear in some regional accents in German. I'm not sufficiently familiar with the range of German accents, so this might be a common phenomenon that I just don't know about.



#12Authoreric (new york) (63613) 15 Jan 11, 15:20
Comment
@12:

Das halte ich für unwahrscheinlich. Ich zumindest kenne keine deutsche Varietät, in der es das englische [w] neben dem oder statt des [v] gibt.
#13AuthorNicki (DE) (616721) 15 Jan 11, 16:12
Comment
@eric, Looking forward to your paper on this being "hypercorrection". Post in online!^^
#14Authoropine (680211) 15 Jan 11, 16:15
Comment
#7 maybe I'll never be able to learn to speak it better!

Oh, you can learn these things, with time. I didn't use to hear the difference between u and ü but now it sounds perfectly clear to me, and I can produce the two sounds properly. Though that doesn't stop me fluffing it up when I speak, mainly as my brain still has trouble noting down whether a word contains a u or a ü.

The "v" in "very" sounds like the "w" in Wilhelm. Your top front teeth are on your bottom lip when you say it. It's the same as an "f", but you use your voice.

This is different to the "w" in "when. When you say that, you use only your lips. Basically, you're just saying an "oo" sound at the start of the word: oo-en. (Some people also say it with an "h" sound at the start - h-when.)
#15AuthorCM2DD (236324) 15 Jan 11, 16:32
Comment
@ SD3: Umlaute sind eine deutsche Gemeinheit, die nur erfunden wurde, um Anderssprachige zu ärgern. ;-)


Zu dem W / V-Problem: Ich denke, dass es manchmal vielleicht Hyperkorrektur sein könnte, aber ich glaube doch, dass es oft einfach die Lautkombination im Satz oder im Wort ist, die einem Deutschen Probleme macht.

Das Problem tritt auch gern beim th auf. Manches th-Wort kriege ich jedenfalls einigermaßen hin (soweit ich das beurteilen kann), bei anderen klappt es nie.



Ich kann mich übrigens nicht erinnern, dass ich in der Schule gezielt auf die W / V-Problematik hingewiesen worden wäre. Entweder habe ich es vergessen, oder niemand hat es für wichtig gehalten, daran zu arbeiten. Auch deshalb zweifle ich an der Hyperkorrektur als (Haupt-)Erklärung.
#16AuthorIgelin DE (467049) 15 Jan 11, 16:37
Comment
Agree with Igelin, again. (Which pains me^^). But for reality, I support you on this issue Igelin!
#17Authoropine (680211) 15 Jan 11, 16:57
Comment
The sound written w in German is not usually a phonetic [v]: there is less friction and the lips tend to be more rounded. This is also the way that Germans tend to pronounce the English sound written v. The effect to English ears [I mean the ears of English speakers] is very much that of a [w], though in fact it is neither a [v] nor a [w]. Personally I don't think it's a case of over-correction; you hear it from learners who are not sophisticated enough to overcorrect. Didactically, I instruct Germans to bite their bottom lip when they say an English v.
#18Authorescoville (237761) 15 Jan 11, 17:19
Comment
escoville, you don't need to be "sophisticated" in order to hypercorrect! German learners of English tend to concentrate on those phenomena that don't exist in their native language: w, th, the -ing form ... I did that myself when I started learning English: "Dawid ith thinging wery well" instead of "David sings very well".
Actually, my last English teacher of my Abitur-Leistungskurs said things like "Indian women have to wear a whale" (she meant "veil", of course, and our British exchange student almost died laughing).
#19AuthorRaudona (255425) 15 Jan 11, 17:44
Comment
Thank you, escoville, for your explanation of the German w sound. The German w does not sound exactly the same as the English v to me, and now perhaps I know why.
#20AuthorSD3 (451227) 15 Jan 11, 18:03
Comment
#3 Du willst doch nicht allen Ernstes behaupten, dass "Ouijaboard" ein im Standardhochdeutsch verbreitetes Wort ist? :-o

Ich hab's jedenfalls bis zu diesem Moment noch nie gehört, gelesen oder gar ausgesprochen...
#21AuthorCalifornia81 (642214) 15 Jan 11, 18:17
Comment
This thread reminds me of one of those jokes where you are given the answer and must come up with the question.

The answer is "9W".

The question is: "Do you spell your name with a 'V', Herr Wagner?"
#22Authorion1122 (443218) 15 Jan 11, 18:19
Comment
#21 What else are they usually called in Germany? Wikipedia offers a few suggestions, but it's hard to tell what might be the most common. I've only ever heard it called Ouija in German, but that might have been in dubbed films.
#23AuthorCM2DD (236324) 15 Jan 11, 18:28
Comment
Semideutsches Wort

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouija

Das Wort Ouija wurde aus dem französischen Wort "Oui" (welches "ja" bedeutet) und dem deutschen Wort "ja" gebildet. Es wird /ˈwi:ʤə/ oder /ˈwi:ʤi:/ ausgesprochen.

#24AuthorPachulke (286250) 15 Jan 11, 19:04
Comment
#3: Ich entnehme Wikipedia zur Aussprache von Ouija(board):

"possibly derived from the French and German/Dutch words for "yes", oui and ja"
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouija).

Wenn das stimmt, dann handelt es sich um ein Fremdwort, also ein Wort, dessen Lautung nicht an das deutsche Phoneminventar angepasst wurde (in Gegensatz zum Lehnwort) - wie das ja schon die Schreibung zeigt. Damit taugt es nicht als Beleg für die Existenz des [w] im Deutschen.

Edit: Pachulke war schneller...
#25AuthorCro-Mignon (751134) 15 Jan 11, 19:04
Comment
#23 What else are they usually called in Germany?

Ich habe keine Ahnung. Ich habe so ein Ding noch nie irgendwie genannt, und ich kenne auch niemanden, der es (in meiner Gegenwart) so oder anders genannt hätte. Ohne Wiki hätte ich das wahrscheinlich für ein Zusatzteil zum Wii-Gerät gehalten. ;-)

Nun gibt es zwar sicherlich irgendwelche urdeutschen Wörter, die ich (muttersprachlich) nicht kenne, aber ich meine doch dann zumindest wohl behaupten zu können, dass sie dann nicht allzu verbreitet sein können.


#25 Damit taugt es nicht als Beleg für die Existenz des [w] im Deutschen.

Sach' ich ja... :-)
#26AuthorCalifornia81 (642214) 15 Jan 11, 19:50
Comment
How do most German speakers pronounce import words that are (I trust) more familiar, like Windows or Subway (the sandwich)?

Obviously those don't really count either, but surely people have to say them.
#27Authorhm -- us (236141) 15 Jan 11, 19:58
Comment
#26: Sach' ich ja

Klar, California, indirekt schon. Mir ging es aber darum, dass Opine (in #3) dieses Zauberdings als Beleg dafür anführte, [w] sei ein standarddeutsches Phonem.


#28AuthorCro-Mignon (751134) 15 Jan 11, 20:00
Comment
Denke schon, dass man bei einem Gebrauch von zu viel /w/ im Englischen von Hyperkorrektur sprechen kann:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypercorrection
"Linguistic hypercorrection occurs when a real or imagined grammatical or phonetical rule is applied in a mistaken or non-standard context, so that an attempt to be "correct" leads to an incorrect result"


Zum Vorkommen des /w/ in deutschen Dialekten sagt Tante Wiki (keine Ahnung, ob das stimmt und wie es sich anhört, wohl noch etwas anders als das englische /w/, auch bilabial-velar genannt):

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilabial
"Früher im Mittelhochdeutschen bilabiales w heute noch z. B. im Bairischen (z. B. bairisch gesprochen Wasser)."


Ich bezweifle aber, dass deutsches "w" (/v/) und englisches "v" (/v/) unterschiedlich sind; im Studium haben wir diese Laute immer gleich transkribiert. Vielleicht gibt es individuelle oder regionale Allophone davon, aber im Wesentlichen dürfte es sich um denselben Laut handeln.

Etwas Ähnliches passiert aber auch umgekehrt mit dem deutschen Graphem "z" (/ts/). Da "z" in vielen Sprachen als /z/ realisiert wird, ist es bei Deutschlernern ganz schwer wegzukriegen, obwohl /ts/ auch im Englischen vorkommt, aber eben nicht am Anfang von einem Wort.

#29AuthorIngeborg (274140) 15 Jan 11, 20:10
Comment
@27: How do most German speakers pronounce import words that are (I trust) more familiar, like Windows or Subway (the sandwich)?

Die Mehrheit der Deutschen - vermute ich - passt die fremden Laute den eigenen Schrift-Laut-Entsprechungen an und sagt etwa "Windohs" (mit [v]). Wer die jeweilige Fremdsprache gut beherrscht, wird eher die Originalaussprache nachahmen. Es hängt aber auch davon ab, wie weit ein Fremdwort schon auf dem Weg zum Lehnwort fortgeschritten ist. Ich frage z. B. beim Metzger nach /kɔrnət bi:f/, nicht /kɔ:nd bi:f/, allein schon, um verstanden zu werden.
#30AuthorCro-Mignon (751134) 15 Jan 11, 20:41
Comment
Die Mehrheit der Deutschen - vermute ich - passt die fremden Laute den eigenen Schrift-Laut-Entsprechungen an und sagt etwa "Windohs" (mit [v]).

How do Germans usually pronounce "Washington"? With a German W-sound or an English W-sound?
#31Authoreric (new york) (63613) 15 Jan 11, 20:53
Comment
With a German W-sound, denke ich.

Es kommt oft zu "Mischaussprachen", wie im Beispiel Washington: "sh" als [ʃ], aber "w" als [v].

Edit: Eigenkorrektur zu #28: /w/, nicht [w].
#32AuthorCro-Mignon (751134) 15 Jan 11, 20:55
Comment
I feel like I've heard the Wash- part as in English, on Deutsche Welle and so on, but it's the -ington that sounds more German; they seem not to aspirate the T of -ton, and the syllabic stress seems to shift somehow, with more emphasis than in English on -ing.
#33Authorhm -- us (236141) 15 Jan 11, 21:05
Comment
Wenn ich mir selbst zuhöre, ist es sicher Hyperkorrektur. Ich kann den Unterschied v-w im Englischen hören und ihn auch aussprechen, aber nur wenn ich mich auf die Aussprache konzentriere. Nachdem ich mich aber meist auf den Inhalt konzentrieren muss, den ich übermitteln will, geht die saubere Aussprache oft flöten. (Wir kennen alle den peinlichen Moment, in dem man in einer Fremdsprache etwas Wichtiges und Gescheites sagen will und sich während des Sprechens dabei ertappt, Fehler zu machen... oder? :-))

Als Sprecherin eines bairischen Dialektes - mit, glaube ich, generell guten Ohren für Aussprachevarianten - kenne ich den englischen w-Laut im Deutschen nicht.
#34Authortigger (236106) 15 Jan 11, 21:12
Comment
Für mich klingt das V von LEO in "very" wie ein in Richtung F verschobenes deutsches W, das W in "water" dagegen wie ein deutsches U.

In der S-Bahn 46 (Berlin und Umgebung) spricht die automatische Ansage das W in Schöneweide fast wie ein U: Schöneuaide.

Das sind allerdings synthetische Stimmen (denke ich), ein Thema für sich.
#35AuthorMarco P (307881) 15 Jan 11, 21:12
Comment
#33: I feel like I've heard the Wash- part as in English, on Deutsche Welle and so on

Ich glaube auch, dass in den Funkmedien - im Unterschied zur Masse der Bevölkerung - eine mehr am Original ausgerichtete Aussprache gepflegt wird.

(Obwohl ich von deutschen Nachrichtensprechern schon viele grauenhafte Versuche gehört habe, fremde Namen auszusprechen... :-))
#36AuthorCro-Mignon (751134) 15 Jan 11, 21:13
Comment
Und zur Aussprache englischer Wörter in einem deutschen Satz muss ich sagen, dass ich es eher lächerlich finde, diese extrem deutlich "richtig" auszusprechen. Ich kann leidlich Englisch und Französisch und weiß, wie Spanisch und Italienisch klingen, ich muss nicht ständig von 'Ouashingtn', 'Parí' etc. sprechen, um das zu betonen. Der Ungar wird auch von Bécs sprechen in einem ungarischen Satz, und nicht von Wien.

Edit: Ach, Cro-Mignon, die deutschsprachigen Nachrichtensprecher geben sich eh viel Mühe. Eine meiner prägenden Kindheitserinnerungen ist die Wandlung vom Arbeiterführer Walehsa zum Präsidenten Wawönsa... man erinnere sich an die z.B. tschechische Usance, jeder Frau ein -ova anzuhängen, z.B. auch Frau Merkelova und Frau Grafova. Hört sich neuerdings auf, habe ich mir sagen lassen (ohne Tschechisch zu beherrschen).
#37Authortigger (236106) 15 Jan 11, 21:14
Comment
#37: Sicher, tigger, eine übertrieben um fremdsprachliche Korrektheit bemühte Aussprache hat, jedenfalls in vielen alltagssprachlichen Situationen, schon etwas Lächerliches. Und bei Ortsnamen, für die es ein deutsches Pendant gibt, benutzt sowieso kaum jemand hierzulande (inkl. Österreich ;-)) die Originalaussprache bzw. den Originalnamen.

Eine meiner prägenden Kindheitserinnerungen ist die Wandlung vom Arbeiterführer Walehsa zum Präsidenten Wawönsa

:-) Ja, daran erinnere ich mich auch noch gut. Auf einmal schien der einen anderen Namen zu haben.
#38AuthorCro-Mignon (751134) 15 Jan 11, 21:24
Comment
Stimme Tigger zu: Wenn ich sage, Ich war letzten Monat in London, dann sage ich Lonndonn und nicht Landn (sorry, Lautschrift schreiben dauert bei mir ewig, aber ich denke, es wird klar). Englische Wörte im Deutschen Satz mit Turboenglischakzent auszusprechen klingt eigentlich nur albern.

Und ich muss noch unbedingt meine Lieblingsgeschiche zu dem Thema loswerden:

Mein Spanischschüler fragt mich, warum die Deutschen immer 'Majorka' sagen, obwohl die deutschen Aussprachregeln doch ganz anders sind.

Weil das doch so heißt, sage ich.

Mein Spanischschüler muss so sehr lachen, dass er sich verschluckt, und meint dann, wir könnten ruhig 'Mallorka' sagen (mit 'L'), das würde keinerlei Unterschied machen; was immer wir da von uns geben, klingt definitiv nicht Spanisch. Dann hat er mal 'Mallorca' gesagt...

Seitdem bin ich damit viel entspannter :)
#39AuthorGibson (418762) 15 Jan 11, 21:28
Comment
Die Deutschen sagen eh Mallórka oder gleich Malle. Das sind eher die Briten mit Majorca... die schreiben es ja sogar so. *grins*
Aber die Aussprache von Fremdwörtern in der eigenen Sprache ist ein anderer Dampfer, die 'Dose Würmer' wollen wir lieber nicht öffnen (bzw. haben es schon oft genug im Forum).

Das Schrägste an Fremdsprachenakzenten ist derzeit meine deutsche Kollegin, deren Englisch einen hörbar niederländischen Akzent hat. Aber dafür hat sie auch keine Probleme mit v-w, weil das die Niederländer offenbar besser können.
#40Authortigger (236106) 15 Jan 11, 21:41
Comment
Kürzlich schon wieder gehört im Deutschlandfunk - einem sehr ordentlichen Sender -, in einer Sendung "aus Wissenschaft und Forschung" oder ähnlich

Statt "an der University of California": an der UniWHersity of Cal...

Viele deutsche Radiomoderatoren, Sprecher/innen bringen leider diesen Fehler, posaunen dies in die Hörerschaft hinein. Leider auch im DLF. Aua.
Wie ich mitbekomme, lehren es auch auf dem Gymnasium so manche Lehrer falsch. Dann ist es auch kein Wunder.

Etwas OT:
Wie habe ich mich als Kind über meine Schwester geärgert, die die Zeitschrift "VOGUE" so aussprach, wie es richtig ist - "wöüg" halt. Ich aber bestand darauf, es müsse "FOGJÜ" heißen. Ich war so stolz, dass ich es nicht Deutsch, sondern Englisch aussprach. Dass es sowas wie Französisch gibt, war mir damals und dort in S.A. halt nicht klar.

#41AuthorBraunbärin (757733) 15 Jan 11, 21:54
Comment
A propos, warum nennen sich deutsche Medienarbeiter eigentlich neuerdings 'Dschórnalisten' statt wie früher 'Schurnalísten'?
#42Authortigger (236106) 15 Jan 11, 22:08
Comment
"FOGJÜ" - das ist aber doch eben nicht die englische Aussprache (ich meine jetzt nicht das Wort 'vogue', sondern 'v' wie 'f' auszusprechen)
#43AuthorGibson (418762) 15 Jan 11, 22:26
Comment
But Braunbärin didn't know that then, I imagine.

Even for native speakers, it was frustrating as a child when you were sure you had learned a principle of phonetics, like vogue, fugue, vague, Hague -- and then to be confronted with something like ague. I swore up and down that the dictionaries must be wrong; it just didn't make sense, they had obviously misunderstood the concept. (-;
#44Authorhm -- us (236141) 15 Jan 11, 23:20
Comment
#41 Wie habe ich mich als Kind über meine Schwester geärgert, die die Zeitschrift "VOGUE" so aussprach, wie es richtig ist - "wöüg" halt. Ich aber bestand darauf, es müsse "FOGJÜ" heißen.

Wir haben eine begnadete Hobbyköchin in der Familie, die besteht darauf, dass es zum Dessert "Muhsseeh" au Chocolat gibt, und dass das die richtige französische Aussprache sei... :-)
#45AuthorCalifornia81 (642214) 15 Jan 11, 23:43
Comment
In accounting for v/w interchanges with a grand overarching Theory Of Everything, linguists might like to include the phenomenon of 19th century Cockney interchange of v and w. Dickens' "The Pickwick Papers" has many gems such as:
'He always falls down when he's took out o' the cab,' continued the
driver, 'but when he's in it, we bears him up werry tight, and takes
him in werry short, so as he can't werry well fall down; and we've got
a pair o' precious large wheels on, so ven he does move, they run after
him, and he must go on--he can't help it.'


Note: werry, wheels ,well, we've but ven!
#46AuthorEcgberht (469528) 15 Jan 11, 23:52
Comment
Eine meiner prägenden Kindheitserinnerungen ist die Wandlung vom Arbeiterführer Walehsa zum Präsidenten Wawönsa

My understanding is that the original Polish pronunciation of the L in Wałensa (an L with a slash through it) is like the English /w/ sound, not the German /w/ sound (see http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aussprache_des_Polnischen).

You're transliterating it here as Wawönsa. How is it pronounced in German? /vawensa/ or /vavensa/? In other words, is the ł pronounced like the German W or like the English W?
#47Authoreric (new york) (63613) 16 Jan 11, 02:03
Comment
In accounting for v/w interchanges with a grand overarching Theory Of Everything, linguists might like to include the phenomenon of 19th century Cockney interchange of v and w. Dickens' "The Pickwick Papers" has many gems such

Interesting. I also notice that some of my Indian colleagues (from India) speak English with an accent that which uses the /w/ sound where I would use the /v/ sound. For example, I work with a guy whose name in English is spelled Ravoori. To my ears it sounds like Rawoori.

Of course, names are not really a good example, because his original name is pronounced however it's pronounced in his native language (perhaps Hindi), and Ravoori is an English transliteration, not actually the original spelling. But I've also noticed this substitution of /w/ for /v/ also in English sometimes in one type of Indian accent speaking English.
#48Authoreric (new york) (63613) 16 Jan 11, 02:09
Comment
Habe gerade versucht "very well" mehrmals hintereinander zu sagen, nach einer Zeit wird's immer zu "wery well". Dammit...
Anderseits kann ich mir gar nicht richtig vorstellen wie jemand "Wonderwall" mit deutschem "w" aussprechen kann... wird dann fast zu "Vanderval"
(bitte nicht verwechseln mit Van-der-Waals-Kräften)

[Oh gott, bei Google gibt's sogar Wan-der-Vaals-Kräfte]
#49AuthorBeerheinz (764761) 16 Jan 11, 03:15
Comment
Die deutschsprachigen Nachrichtensprecher geben sich eh viel Mühe. (tigger @37)

Im Allgemeinen schon, aber durchaus nicht immer. Aus traurigem, aktuellem Anlass hört man derzeit viel von Tucson. Die Aussprachevarianten, die ich in den letzten Tagen im Radio vernommen habe, reichten von [tʌksən] über [tju:sən] bis [tu:sɒn]; [tukson] war bezeichnenderweise nicht dabei. Man versucht also schon, die englische Aussprache zu treffen, und liegt dabei oft genug falsch (besonders in Fällen, in denen die Originallautung von dem abweicht, was man erwarten könnte, wie bei Salisbury, Warwick, Worcester, Harwich usw.).

#50AuthorCro-Mignon (751134) 16 Jan 11, 13:22
Comment
#49. FWIW. That made me laugh "van der Waals".

Right on topic!!! They exist in German and in English.
#51Authoropine (680211) 16 Jan 11, 13:25
Comment
@eric, #47: Das war eher ein Scherz mit Walesa. Man ist jedenfalls dazu übergegangen, den Namen möglichst polnisch-richtig auszusprechen, ich glaube dieses durchgestrichene l hat in beiden hier diskutierten deutschen oder englischen Lauten keine 1:1-Entsprechung.

Zu Tucson fällt mir auch nur Get Back von den Beatles ein... "Jojo left his home in [tu:sɒn], Arizona..."
Das wäre immerhin ein Ort, bei dem man sich vorher nach der Aussprache erkundigen könnte. Den Dings-Vulkan auf Island kann ja auch keiner aussprechen, da hätte man sich schon ausgezeichnet durch das Wissen, dass -jökull der Gletscher dazu ist, der bestimmt nicht ausgebrochen war.
#52Authortigger (236106) 16 Jan 11, 13:36
Comment
Tucson = French, no?

EDIT: Spanish. No se.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_did_tucson_arizona_get_its_name

I have to wonder if Spanish speakers overcorrect when pronouncing.
#53Authoropine (680211) 16 Jan 11, 13:45
Comment
Besonders schwer wird es deutschen auch durch die Verenglischung bekannter Namen gemacht.
Wenn ich in einem US Werbespot "Volkswagen" höre, rollen sich mir die Fußnägel. Wenn jemand den Unterschied sowieso kaum hört, klingt es manchmal wie "Ouölksouägönn" aber das Ei hat VW ja selbst gelegt.
#54AuthorBeerheinz (764761) 16 Jan 11, 14:36
Comment
"Ouölksouägönn" are being made in China as we speak/write. Patent that, Beerheinz,
before someone else does.
#55Authoropine (680211) 16 Jan 11, 14:49
Comment
:-))) unfortunately China doesn't care about patents.
#56AuthorBeerheinz (764761) 16 Jan 11, 15:01
Comment
tigger, Autor #52, glaubt, "dieses durchgestrichene [polnische] Ł hat in beiden hier diskutierten deutschen oder englischen Lauten keine 1:1-Entsprechung."

Eric's, Author #47, "understanding is that the original Polish pronunciation of the Ł in Wałensa (an Ł with a slash through it) is like the English /w/ sound, not the German /w/ sound (see http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aussprache_des_Polnischen )."

Im englischen praktisch 1:1-Entsprechung wie wood. Und sogar die akzuentuierten ó entsprechen fast den englischen oo, aber da passt noch besser U-Bahn.

hhttp://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%81%C3%B3d%C5%BA
Łódź (Zum Anhören bitte klicken! ['wut͡ɕ]) (dt. Lodz, auch Lodsch, 1940–1945: Litzmannstadt)
#57AuthorPachulke (286250) 16 Jan 11, 15:03
Comment
Danke für die Übersicht, Pachulke. Ich glaub gar nix, vielmehr dürfte anhand meiner unqualifizierten Umschreibungen offensichtlich sein, dass ich kein Polnisch kann.

Und OT: Namen kann man nicht patentieren, schützen aber auch in China. Und ihr dürft davon ausgehen, dass VW sämtliche Marken auch in sämtlichen denkbaren Varianten in chinesischen Schriftzeichen hat schützen lassen.
#58Authortigger (236106) 16 Jan 11, 15:22
Comment
Ach ja, die Ausspracheregeln fremdländischer Worte...

Gespräch vor Jahren zwischen US-Bekannten:
"Did you see her new Datsun?"
"Oh, did she get a new Dachshund?"

(Mir persönlich fällt es zwar etwas schwer, mir vorzustellen, wie man diese beiden Wörter akustisch verwechseln kann, aber für die beiden Sprecher klang das offenbar praktisch gleich.)
#59AuthorCalifornia81 (642214) 18 Jan 11, 09:58
Comment
Mal zurück zum Thema. Ein Übungssatz, der für viele Deutsche ein echter Zungenbreche ist bzw. ein hohes Maß an Konzentration erfordert: It was a very wet November in Wolverhampton.
#60AuthorWaverley18 Jan 11, 11:13
Comment
#59, That's a funny one, CA81. That pronunciation is a bit all over
the map in AE, since we don't really have the "ch" sounds per se.

I've also heard it pronounced: docksun (phonetically)

Actually, you don't mean the car here do you?
#61Authoropine (680211) 18 Jan 11, 11:27
Comment
#61: Actually, you don't mean the car here do you?

I was tempted to say it depends on how you pronounce "Datsun" (...but thought better of it! ;-))...
#62AuthorKinkyAfro (587241) 18 Jan 11, 11:29
Comment
Besonders hinterhältig finde ich die Tatsache, dass in einem vineyard vine wächst, aus dem man dann wine keltert.
Wer ohnehin Schwierigkeiten mit der Unterscheidung w-v hat, der ist hier endgültig verloren!
#63AuthorLutz B (319260) 18 Jan 11, 11:48
Comment
Hat zwar nix mit v und w zu tun, kann man aber auch drüber stolpern:

shift schedule

Zumindest mach ich mir dabei dauernd nen halben Knoten in die Zunge.
#64AuthorCeeJayThe1 (764057) 18 Jan 11, 12:33
Comment
#64: ...shift schedule...

And do you pronounce "schedule" with a "sk" or a "sh" sound?
:-)
#65AuthorKinkyAfro (587241) 18 Jan 11, 12:35
Comment
I do with an "sk"

But who knows? I might have done it wrong all those years
#66AuthorCeeJayThe1 (764057) 18 Jan 11, 12:36
Comment
#39: War der Schüler Spanier oder Katalane? Mallorkinische Einwohner sprechen nämlich Catalá und sagen daher nicht wie die Spanier Majorka sonder Mallorka.

Mit Lech Walese kam daher weil die Buchstaben früher nicht gesetzt werden konnten. Ein durchgestrichenes L gab es in den Zeitungen nicht und wurde daher wie L ausgesprochen. Richtig ist es eher ein schnelles "wuoh"
#67Authorzelski18 Jan 11, 12:46
Comment
Dann hat der Spanischschüler von # 39 nicht ganz Recht.

In Castellano (was allgemein als Spanisch bezeichnet wird) heißt es sehr wohl Majorca
#68AuthorCeeJayThe1 (764057) 18 Jan 11, 12:49
Comment
Erst gestern habe ich wieder eine Programmvorschau im Fernsehen gehört, in der auf die Sendung "Whampire Diaries" hingewiesen wurde ;o)
#69AuthorDragon (238202) 18 Jan 11, 13:05
Comment
OT re #66: shift schedule .... But who knows? I might have done it wrong all those years....

If you pronounced "schedule" in the traditional BE way (i.e. "sh" not "sk"), you might find it easier! :-)
#70AuthorKinkyAfro (587241) 18 Jan 11, 13:07
Comment
Ich sage nur: Interwiew vith a whampire...
#71Authorigm (387309) 18 Jan 11, 13:10
Comment
#61 Actually, you don't mean the car here do you?

Doch, natürlich. Was sonst? Auto vs. Hund!
#72AuthorCalifornia81 (642214) 18 Jan 11, 13:11
Comment
Auch immer wieder ein Brüller:

Goldilocks and de tree bääs (So klingt das bei einem Kumpel aus Dublin)
#73AuthorCeeJayThe1 (764057) 18 Jan 11, 13:17
Comment
OT re #73: ...de tree bääs...

Actually quite a handy accent to adopt for those with "th" problems ;-) (SCNR :-)) ... though I'd expect a Dubliner to pronounce the "r" of "bear" quite distinctly (unlike, say, in my accent)... but I might be mistaken about that ...
#74AuthorKinkyAfro (587241) 18 Jan 11, 13:22
Comment
Not only for those. I adopted it to. (My pronunciation teacher during my language studies hated it)
#75AuthorCeeJayThe1 (764057) 18 Jan 11, 13:24
Comment
Interessant finde ich, dass, auch wenn man jemandem sagt, dass er das "V" in einem englischen Wort falsch ausspricht, es nicht hilft - es ändert sich nicht.

Ich habe damit keine Probleme. Als ich aber neulich ein englischsprachiges Anwaltsschreiben mit mehreren lateinischen Ausdrücken vorlesen musste, klangen die lateinischen Partien schon sehr komisch, da ich gerade auf "Englisch" geschaltet hatte und mitten im Satz nicht zurückkam.

Als Lektüre zum Thema "Englische Aussprache" empfehle ich auch noch:
http://www.ic.unicamp.br/~stolfi/PUB/misc-misc/DearestCreature.html
#76AuthorHe-le-na (743297) 18 Jan 11, 13:30
Comment
Dafür kann kein Ami richtig München sagen. Es kommt nur ein Mjunkjen dabei heraus. Hihi wie lustig!
#77Authorder Alois18 Jan 11, 13:35
Comment
Alois, Italiener und Spanier sind auch nicht viel besser dabei
#78AuthorCeeJayThe1 (764057) 18 Jan 11, 13:36
Comment
Fast jeder Deutsche kann ein mehr oder weniger schlechtes englisch, aber fast kein Amerikaner spricht ein mehr oder weniger gutes deutsch.

#79Authorohrenkneifer18 Jan 11, 13:50
Comment
What learners can do and what they actually do are often very different. Italians who pronounce "bitterly" quite normally will persist in saying "eetaly".

Obviously if you can pronounce an [f] labio-dentally (as all Germans can) it shouldn't be too difficult to pronounce a [v] thus either, but evidently it is...

A difficult simple sentence: She has very wavy red hair.
#80Authorescoville (237761) 18 Jan 11, 13:59
Comment
One day ima gonna Malta to bigga hotel. Ina morning I go down to eat breakfast. I tella waitress I wanna two pissis toast. She brings me only one piss. I tella her I want two piss. She say go to the toilet. I say, you no understand, I wanna piss onna my plate. She say, you better no piss onna plate, you sonna ma bitch. I don't even know the lady and she call me sonna ma bitch. Later I go to eat at the bigga restaurant. The waitress brings me a spoon and knife but no fock. I tella her I wanna fock. She tell me everyone wanna fock. I tell her you no understand. I wanna fock on the table. She say, you better not fock on the table, you sonna ma bitch. So I go back to my room inna hotel and there is no shits onna my bed. Call the manager and tella him I wanna shit. He tell me to go to toilet. I say you no understand. I wanna shit on my bed. He say you better not shit onna bed, you sonna ma bitch. I go to the checkout and the man at the desk say: "Peace on you". I say piss on you too, you sonna ma bitch, I gonna back to Italy
#81Authorandrew18 Jan 11, 14:12
Comment
# 81 is a good one
#82AuthorCeeJayThe1 (764057) 18 Jan 11, 14:14
Comment
Zur V - W Geschichte: Meine Übergeneralisierung am Anfang des Englischunterrichts war "alles was im Deutschen w ist (also, deutsche Aussprache Wasser aber auch Vase etc) wird im Englishen zu "w", also dem englischen w nicht v". Obwohl ich im Unterricht durchaus aktiv mitgearbeitet habe, hat keiner meiner Lehrer mich verbessert (waren vielleicht zu fixiert auf das th?), so daß ich erst im Englischstudium an der Uni darauf hingewiesen wurde, daß "The wizard of Oz isn't a wery wonderful adwenture" ;) Wurde versucht mit Sätzen wie "The pitch of the whistle varies with the volume of water in the vessle" das auszutreiben, aber ist eines der Aussprachephänomene über die ich manchmal immer noch stolpere :(
Der Punkt ist, daß Kinder beim Lernen übergeneralisieren und wenn niemand darauf hinweist, daß die "Regel" nicht richtig ist, werden Sie nicht zwingend von selbst daraufkommen.
#83Authorsuski18 Jan 11, 14:19
Comment
@tigger (#34 - auch wenn ich jetzt im Faden weit zurückgreife): Ich glaube doch, dass das W in bairischer Aussprache wegen seiner "Zahnlosigkeit" zumindest eine Mischung aus dem W im Englischen und dem norddeutschen W (= englischen V) ist, das ja ein klarer Unterlippe-an-Oberzähne-Laut ist.
#84AuthorHenk L. (244857) 18 Jan 11, 15:20
Comment
Jetzt muss ich auch noch ne Anekdote loswerden. Ich war mal bei einer Gesangsprobe von Händels Messias in Stuttgart. Der amerikanische Gesangslehrer versuchte, einem deutschen Gesangsstudenten die richtige Aussprache von "Death, where is thy victory" beizubringen. Der Deutsche machte den hyperkorrigierenden Fehler, "victory" mit einem /w/ beginnen zu lassen. (Entschuldigung, ich finde hier nicht die Lautschriftzeichen.) Der Amerikaner versuchte ihm die englische Aussprache nahezubringen: "Say Volkswagen, Volkswagen" . Auf Englisch, aber leider nicht auf Deutsch, hat Volkswagen ja denselben Anfangslaut wie victory. Die Verwirrung war komplett - der arme deutsche Student hat's minutenlang nicht geblickt. Ich wär beinahe gestorben vor Lachen. Seitdem ist das ein Familienwitz bei uns, wenn jemand hyperkorrigiert.
#85AuthorFunkturm (706177) 18 Jan 11, 18:33
Comment
#85 Klasse, "Volkswagen" - englisch ausgesprochen - ist da natürlich eine Super-Aussprachehilfe... :D

"Death, where is thy victory" - der Satz ist natürlich auch richtig böse. Wenn dann jemand noch Schwierigkeiten mit dem th hat, dann kann da ja wirklich alles Mögliche bei herauskommen:
"Deas, vere ith sy wictory..."
#86AuthorCalifornia81 (642214) 18 Jan 11, 19:08
Comment
Ja, ich hab zweimal versucht, den Witz Deutschen zu erklären, es hat aber nicht geklappt. Wie schön, dass bei Leo jemand mitlachen kann!
#87AuthorFunkturm (706177) 18 Jan 11, 19:20
Comment
Im Allgemeinen schon, aber durchaus nicht immer. Aus traurigem, aktuellem Anlass hört man derzeit viel von Tucson. Die Aussprachevarianten, die ich in den letzten Tagen im Radio vernommen habe, reichten von [tʌksən] über [tju:sən] bis [tu:sɒn]; [tukson] war bezeichnenderweise nicht dabei.


Ein Trauerspiel ist es genauso, was seit der dort stattgefundenen Olympiade aus der südkoreanischen Hauptstadt gemacht wird. Das ist eben kein "Seelchen"!



#88AuthorRestitutus (765254) 19 Jan 11, 22:01
Comment
Restitutus - Wieso sollte auch [tukson] dabei sein???

Übrigens: Ich habe durchaus schon an der Schule die Aussprache solcher Sätze geübt:

The very wary warrior veered violently where the violets wound very wickedly.

Wilma virtually wishes every weekend for very wild weather.

Which very evil witch vowed to woo the very wonderful Prince VanWaverly?


There are no white vegetarians in western Venezuela.

Genauso wie:

She sells seashells on the seashore.

oder

Which wristwatches are Swiss wristwatches?

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck...?

The sixth sick Sheik's sixth sheep is sick.

Swan swam over the pond,
Swim swan swim!
Swan swam back again -
Well swum swan!


Ich würde auch behaupten, dass das wohl heutzutage an allen Schulen geübt wird.
#89Authorcandice (447114) 21 Jan 11, 11:19
Comment
This is what it comes down to folks:

Der Wodka - Deutsch

vodka - English

They are pronounced exactly the same way! Why do German speakers then say "wodka" (English pronounciation). It physically hurts to hear that. Just speak your native language and you're already infinitely closer! The pronounciation is handed to you on a plate. Accept the gift (instead of turning it into "Gift").

Igelin, you've completely missed the point. This isn't about what non-native speakers can't pronounce because the sound doesn't exist in the native language. This is about wilfully ignoring the correct pronounciation which exists in the native language and going for something incorrect which does not exist in the native language. The "logic" behind it still troubles me.
#90AuthorMe (GB) (745809) 21 Jan 11, 12:22
Comment
And how about the Austrian "was" (English pronounciation "vas") being pronounced as "wos" (English pronounciation)? That's the only "w" I can think of in German. It's not exactly the same, but it's close.
#91AuthorMe (GB) (745809) 21 Jan 11, 12:26
Comment
Mist, jetzt ist uns einer draufgekommen! Ja, wir machen das mit voller Absicht, nur um Dich und alle anderen zu nerven, Me(GB)! Willfull, wie wir nun mal sind.
#92AuthorRussisch Brot (340782) 21 Jan 11, 12:32
Comment
The pron(o)unciation is handed to you on a plate.
But not the spelling apparently. ;-)
#93AuthorSD3 (451227) 21 Jan 11, 12:39
Comment
Me (GB): It physically hurts to hear that.

Je öfter ich das hier im Forum lese, desto unsicherer werde ich, wenn ich mit Englisch-Muttersprachlern Englisch sprechen muss...

Ich kann mich ganz wunderbar ausdrücken, streiten, wieder vertragen, Witze machen etc., wenn ich nur mit anderen Nicht-Muttersprachlern Englisch spreche. Ich mach mir einfach keinen Kopf um mögliche Fehler oder meinen ggf. ohrenkrebsauslösenden Akzent.
Ist in der Runde ein Muttersprachler, sag ich inzwischen nahezu gar nichts mehr.

#94AuthorVW21 Jan 11, 12:50
Comment
VW, mach dir nichts draus, wenn es jemanden 'hurts' - das liegt dann an dessen Überempfindlichkeit. Soll er sich halt die Zehennägel kürzer schneiden, wenn sie sich so leicht kringeln - das ist eh besser für die Lebensdauer der Socken.

Im Deutschen hören wir doch auch sofort, ob jemand aus Sachsen, Schwaben, der Schweiz, England oder den USA kommt. Das ist ein Teil der Information, die wir in der Kommunikation erhalten.
#95Authormanni3 (305129) 21 Jan 11, 13:19
Comment
Don't worry, VW, some of us do realise that even if you know the theory it may not come out well in practice. Most Brits are in awe of Germans for their amazing English, to be honest, even the ones who laugh at their pronunciation.

Words like "Wodka" are especially hard for me in German - if I'm not careful that will come out as "vodka" even though I know the vowels should sound quite different if you say the German right. How is it for you, Me (GB)?
#96AuthorCM2DD (236324) 21 Jan 11, 13:28
Comment
#96 Zumindest hast Du in "Wodka" aber schonmal den richtigen "w"-Laut...
#97AuthorCalifornia81 (642214) 21 Jan 11, 13:31
Comment
manni3: ja klar, aber ich verbuche das wirklich nur unter "Information", nicht unter "körperlichen Schmerzen".

Akzent, seltsame Betonung, "falsche" Aussprache stören mich übrigens bei Nicht-Deutsch-Muttersprachlern ü-ber-haupt nicht, solange das alles nicht die Kommunikation unmöglich macht.
#98AuthorVW21 Jan 11, 13:33
Comment
VW - ich will natürlich nicht, dass Du kein Englisch sprichst. Was in diesem Fall "weh tut" ist, dass die deutsche Aussprache schon richtig wäre. Dass man eine neue - weder englisch noch deutsche - Aussprache erfindet, finde ich deswegen schlimm, weil man mühelos die deutsche Aussprache benutzen könnte.

Dass Nichtmuttersprachler andere Worte falsch aussprechen, ist für mich kein Problem. Es ist nur ärgerlich, wenn das Wort richtig ausgesprochen werden könnte, weil es in der Muttersprache auch genauso ausgesprochen wird.
#99AuthorMe (GB) (745809) 21 Jan 11, 13:33
Comment
#94: Je öfter ich das hier im Forum lese, desto unsicherer werde ich, wenn ich mit Englisch-Muttersprachlern Englisch sprechen muss...

Bear in mind that LEO users aren't necessarily very representative of the general population. Many of us on here are (professional) linguists (or like to think we are, at least! :-)). I agree with CM2DD's post in #96: "Don't worry, VW, some of us do realise that even if you know the theory it may not come out well in practice. Most Brits are in awe of Germans for their amazing English, to be honest, even the ones who laugh at their pronunciation."

I'd add that some non-natives' English isn't actually all that good: Brits are often (overly) generous with their praise when it comes to foreign languages, IMO. But even then, the non-native's English is probably better than a native English speaker's (non-existent) German, French or whatever :-).
#100AuthorKinkyAfro (587241) 21 Jan 11, 13:46
Comment
@ 99 Me, vielleicht kannst Du es einfach unter Hyperkorrektur ablegen und akzeptieren, dass es das Phänomen gibt.
#101Authormanni3 (305129) 21 Jan 11, 13:48
Comment
#99 That is kind of the key point with hypercorrection, isn't it? That it would be right if you left it alone? Never dropping your haitches, saying "myself" instead of "me" - all very annoying, but not what you might call wilful.
#102AuthorCM2DD (236324) 21 Jan 11, 13:49
Comment
Menno, Russisch Brot (#92), musst Du denn gleich alles zugeben? Du schadest der ganzen Bewegung!
;-)

Aber ehrlich, Me (GB):
"The "logic" behind it still troubles me."
Gibson und Nicki (DE) haben schon vor fast einer Woche sehr gut beschrieben, was da passiert. Ist gar nicht so schwer zu verstehen ;-)

In Wirklichkeit gibt zwischen Deutsch und Englisch nur wenige Laute, die für die jeweiligen Fremdsprachler schwer auszusprechen wären. Die meisten falschen Klänge sind einfach Zuordnungsfehler, die verschiedene Gründe haben können.
#103AuthorLutz B (319260) 21 Jan 11, 13:52
Comment
Lutz B


Your examples from above are talking about "victim, valley, Vancouver" etc.
Here we're talking about a Polish word, not an English word. It has been "transliterated" so as to be pronounced the same. If you have heard the word once in English, then you can think: "nice, I don't have to bother thinking about the pronunciation in English". We're talking about the whole word here, not just the first letter of an English word. I'm therefore not so sure that it fits that comfortably with the other examples.
#104AuthorMe (GB) (745809) 21 Jan 11, 14:04
Comment
Es ist in der Linguistik auch nachgewiesen, daß man Laute die in der Muttersprache nicht vorkommen, sehr schlecht gehört werden können.

Mit diesem Problem haben Sprachforscher in Afrika sehr häufig zu tun.
#105AuthorHeike21 Jan 11, 14:06
Comment
#104 So if a hypercorrecting h-dropper hears the word "aitch" he can just think "Oh, so that word starts the way I'd naturally pronounce it anyway" and from that moment on he will never say "haitch" again?

My son does some interesting hypercorrection. He has my Essex accent, in which a voiceless "th" often sounds like an "f", especially in fast speech. It took ages for him to start using the "th" sound at all - it was all "vis is too fin". Now he does use the "th" but he's not 100% sure which words really do start with "f", so if in doubt, in school he writes "th" instead - a thish's thins!
#106AuthorCM2DD (236324) 21 Jan 11, 14:14
Comment
The "aitch" "haitch" example doesn't really do it for me. There we're talking about native speakers doing what would appear to be logical: giving "h" an "h" sound.

What I'm talking about is taking the pronunciation of an entire word in your native language and dumping it into the target language because there's no need to do anything to it.

Hypercorrection for me would be more like an English speaker saying drücken instead of drucken because he's got the hang of "ü".

@105 - I'm not talking about sounds that don't exist in German. I'm talking about the same word in the two languages with the same pronunciation and an altered spelling to reflect that.
#107AuthorMe (GB) (745809) 21 Jan 11, 14:30
Comment
Hypercorrection of h-dropping doesn't just relate to the word "haitch", though - it's like Eliza Doolittle's "In 'Artford, 'Ereford, and 'Ampshire, 'urricanes 'ardly hever 'appen". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_history_of_English_fricatives_and_affr...
#108AuthorCM2DD (236324) 21 Jan 11, 14:36
Comment
#109Authormanni3 (305129) 21 Jan 11, 14:36
Comment
*Lachend auf dem Boden roll* Quarkteich
#110AuthorCeeJayThe1 (764057) 21 Jan 11, 14:37
Comment
ME (GB), das Problem hieran ist nur - wann weißt du, dass das englische Wort ebenso wie das deutsche Wort ausgesprochen wird? Und wann nicht? Nimm doch als Beispiel:
Wodka/Vodka
Wetter/weather
Leinen/linen

Hier gibt es schlicht keine Regel, und der Instinkt kann dich auch ganz schnell im Stich lassen.
#111AuthorSandra (de) (237132) 21 Jan 11, 14:39
Comment
I'm not sure, but I think there is a rule...

V is pronounced like v in vodka.
W is pronounced like w in weather.

I can't think of an example where v is pronounced like w...
#112AuthorNat21 Jan 11, 14:42
Comment
Edit: Mein Hinweis auf "Regel" bezog sich auf ME (GB)'s Empfehlung in #107, letzter Absatz: I'm talking about the same word in the two languages with the same pronunciation and an altered spelling to reflect that.
#113AuthorSandra (de) (237132) 21 Jan 11, 14:46
Comment
I see. But it doesn't need to be that complicated does it?

I think German does have the 'w' sound. I've heard it in aua (like when they've hurt themselves)...
#114AuthorNat21 Jan 11, 14:50
Comment
I'd also like to point out that it is hard to take the pronunciation of an entire word in your native language and dump it into the target language because there's no need to do anything to it. When I'm reading a sentence with an English name in it, for example, I feel very self-conscious about saying the name with an English accent. It certainly doesn't come out in my usual Essex accent. Imagine me saying this with an Essex accent for the last word only: "Überraschungsbesuch von Präsident Obama". Präsident Oh-barm-er. That would sound just great.

The first sound of "vodka" and "Wodka" does sound the same to me - maybe wrongly, see #18 - but the rest doesn't. Why would you remember to use the German pronunciation of the first sound, but use the different O and A immediately afterwards? If your brain is switched to "English sounds - ttthhh, wwwww, cat, bat, mat, the rain in Spain" then it will automatically come up with those sounds. And much of the time that will be right!
#115AuthorCM2DD (236324) 21 Jan 11, 14:59
Comment
@Me (GB):
Das Problem ist, dass es nun mal massenhaft Wörter gibt, die im Englischen und im Deutschen gleich oder ähnlich klingen, eben bis auf den W-Laut, und dazu noch die gleiche oder eine ähnliche Bedeutung haben. Die Sprachen sind eben eng verwandt:

Wetter -> wheather
was -> what
wann -> when
Wall -> wall
Welt -> world
Wagen -> waggon
will -> will

und so weiter.

Auf diese Lautverschiebung werden deutsche Gehirne ab der ersten Englischstunde - sei es bewusst oder unbewusst - trainiert, und sie wird irgendwann praktisch automatisch ausgelöst, sobald ein Wort mit W-Laut auftaucht. Glaubst du, dass man in den paar Millisekunden zwischen dem ersten Erscheinen des (deutschen) Wortes "Wodka" im Sprachzentrum, der Transformation ins Englische und dem Aussprechen noch die Zeit hat, darüber nachzudenken, dass es sich in diesem Fall um ein Fremdwort handelt und man die automatische Lautverschiebung von [v] nach [w] zu unterdrücken hat?
#116Authordirk (236321) 21 Jan 11, 15:02
Comment
Sandra

What I'm saying is: you only need to hear the word once in the target language. My experience is that, even when the word has been heard, you still hear people saying "wodka" in English. I know that you're not born with the knowledge that it's pronounced the same. Hmmm, maybe it's people thinking that the spelling is the same, but even still, if you hear it as "v" it should be more natural and easier to pronounce it as "v"
#117AuthorMe (GB) (745809) 21 Jan 11, 15:04
Comment
Ich bin mir des Ausspracheunterschieds zwischen v und wh im Englischen wohl bewusst und weiß theoretisch auch ganz genau, was man wie ausspricht. Aber in Sätzen, in denen beides hintereinander vorkommt, verhasple ich mich trotzdem.

"We were very tired" wird dann zu "we were whery tired" , da kann man nix machen.
#118AuthorBirgila/DE (172576) 21 Jan 11, 15:09
Comment
Dirk

Why is it I've never tried to say "Fodka" in German? Based on your logic I would be trying to pronounce the "v" in "vodka" in a German way and I would come up with "Fodka". I've never heard that from an English native speaker.

I would understand it better if German speakers said "fodka" in English as a simple mispronunciation of the "v", but they're replacing the "v" with a "w" (don't worry, there are no cars involved)and then pronouncing the new letter in an English way.
#119AuthorMe (GB) (745809) 21 Jan 11, 15:12
Comment
Birgila - das macht aber Sinn. Wenn ich aber frage: "what would like to drink" und die Antwort einfach "wodka" ist, liegt es nicht am komplizierten Satz.
#120AuthorMe (GB) (745809) 21 Jan 11, 15:15
Comment
"Inwolft" is particularly common, isn't it?
Even if hypercorrection isn't the correct explanation for this phenomenon, it's a recognised disease that most Germans suffer from at some point, so evidently has something to do with your native language being German, or what you are taught in school. It's something that's really hard to avoid. So just saying "But it's so obvious, just stop doing it!" doesn't help.
#121AuthorCM2DD (236324) 21 Jan 11, 15:17
Comment
@Me (GB):
Auf Anhieb fallen mir keine Wörter ein, die im Englischen mit [v] und im Deutschen mit [f] ausgesprochen werden. Mag sein, dass es welche gibt, aber sicher nicht viele. Es gibt also keinen Grund für englische Muttersprachler, eine Lautverschiebung [v]->[f] zu verinnerlichen. Das erklärt, warum du nicht spontan "Fodka" sagst.
#122Authordirk (236321) 21 Jan 11, 15:26
Comment
Me(GB), wenn du ein Wort nur einmal hören musst und dir dann merken kannst, wie das Wort auszusprechen ist, dann bist du ein sehr glücklicher Mensch und ich beneide dich.
Zur Wodka-Thematik: vielleicht sprechen es so viele Deutsche falsch aus, weil es im Deutschen mit W geschreiben wird? Und bei Wodka ist wirklich nur der Anfangslaut gleich, der Rest klingt anders - hier das Leo-Beispiel:
Dictionary: wodka
(und ich habe es mir angehört, da bei mir Wodka anders als vodka klingt und schon an meiner deutschen Aussprache gezweifelt habe)
#123Authordixie21 Jan 11, 15:27
Comment
ME, ich kann dir schon sagen, woher das kommt:
Viele Deutsche haben im Unterbewusstsein die Regel verankert "englisches 'w(h)' wird wie "u" ausgesprochen (uenn, uär etc.)"

Im Falle von "v" im Englischen macht das deutsche Gehirn dann den Doppelsalto rückwärts: es denkt "v ist wie deutsches w" - doch schon kommt einem die andere Regel in die Quere: "und w ist wie u" - peng, schon hat man den Salat.
#124AuthorBirgila/DE (172576) 21 Jan 11, 15:33
Comment
Back to the vodka/Wodka phenomenon: Perhaps some Germans (subconsciously) think „Wodka“ is an Englisch spelling and pronounce the word accordingly.
#125AuthorStravinsky (unplugged)21 Jan 11, 15:45
Comment
@40 - tigger: das mit deiner Kollegin ist ja interessant! Wodurch zeichnet sich denn ein niederländischer Akzent im Englischen aus? (
Ich wurde nämlich in meinem letzten Urlaub in England gefragt, ob ich aus den Niederlanden sei. Ich weiß nicht wieso, aber ich vermute, die Frage rührte von meinem Akzent her.)
#126AuthorDarth21 Jan 11, 15:59
Comment
126, Darth - Holländisch ist eine Sprache mit Nasallauten, weicher, runder, die Vokale z.B., auch dunkler, das gehackte typisch Deutsche ist geglättet. Das "l" wird weicher ausgesprochen, mehr Zunge nahe am Gaumen, statt nur an den Schneidezähnen. Das "s" wird mehr wie "sh" ausgesprochen. Bist Du aus dem Dtl nahe Holland? Das würde passen, die Kölner z.B. haben ja auch diese Art, das l mit viel Zunge zu sprechen. Viel englischer also.
#127AuthorBraunbärin (757733) 21 Jan 11, 18:26
Comment
Ein deutscher Sportmoderator hat mal bei "Venessa Williams" das V und W vertauscht, also "Wenessa Villiams" gesagt. Er konnte also sehr wohl beide Laute aussprechen. Ich denke, es ist die Unsicherheit: Einer plappert dem anderen etwas (mal Falsches, mal Richtiges) nach. Genau wie bei Franklin D. Roosevelt, der im deutschen Fernsehen fast durchgänging falsch ausgesprochen wird, während man es bei Ronald Reagan immer richtig macht.
#128Authormagic77wand (665524) 21 Jan 11, 18:40
Comment
Und was ist richtig, ['ɹoʊzəvɛlt] oder ['ɹuzvɛlt] ?
#129Authormanni3 (305129) 21 Jan 11, 18:59
Comment
manniz, richtig bei Namen ist immer, wie sich die Leute selbst aussprechen - und das war nun mal 'Rosevelt' und nicht etwa 'Rusevelt'.
#130Authormagic77wand (665524) 21 Jan 11, 20:18
Comment
Na dann bitte: manni3 ;-)
#131Authormanni3 (305129) 21 Jan 11, 20:31
Comment
manni-wasauchimmer, den letzten Buchstaben deines Namen kenne ich leider nicht. Ich dachte das wäre ein "z". Sorry.

Bei Amerikanern ist es mit der Aussprache der Namen oft ein Bischen schwierig. Ich hatte mal einen Kollegen, der "Schroeder" mit Nachnamen hieß, der sich aber ärgerte, wenn ihn wie unseren ex-Bundeskanzler ansprach. Es war ihm wichtig mit "Shrowder" angesprochen zu werden.
#132Authormagic77wand (665524) 21 Jan 11, 20:47
Comment
manni-wasauchimmer, den letzten Buchstaben deines Namen kenne ich leider nicht. Ich dachte das wäre ein "z". Sorry.

Kann passieren, magicHäkchenHäkchenwand.
#133AuthorStravinsky (637051) 21 Jan 11, 22:00
Comment
magic, das mit der 3 war als kleiner Witz gedacht.
Aber Roosevelt habe ich nie seinen Familiennamen aussprechen hören ;-)
#134Authormanni3 (305129) 21 Jan 11, 22:22
Comment
Okay, okay, ich hab's jetzt kapiert :-)

Hier übrigens Roosevelt beim Amtseid, wie er seinen Namen selbst ausspricht:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQhWtRW-KKA
#135Authormagic77wand (665524) 21 Jan 11, 22:49
Comment
aha, also "Rousewlt" :-)
#136AuthorBirgila/DE (172576) 22 Jan 11, 12:42
Comment
Er konnte halt kein Niederländisch, Birgila ;-)
#137Authormanni3 (305129) 22 Jan 11, 13:47
Comment
#132 Ich hatte mal einen Kollegen, der "Schroeder" mit Nachnamen hieß, der sich aber ärgerte, wenn ihn wie unseren ex-Bundeskanzler ansprach. Es war ihm wichtig mit "Shrowder" angesprochen zu werden.

So etwas kann natürlich auch noch andere Gründe haben. Die Deutschen waren nun mal nicht zu allen Zeiten insbesondere des vorigen Jahrhunderts besonders beliebt, und so haben sich viele Deutsche bzw. Deutschstämmige in den USA geradezu über-assimiliert. Mir sind davon auch ein paar Exemplare persönlich bekannt.

Da wurde in den Familien kein Wort mehr Deutsch gesprochen, der eigene Name wurde möglichst englischklingend ausgesprochen, etc. etc., damit man möglichst nicht sofort als Deutsche identifizierbar ist. Was natürlich zumindest in der ersten Generation im Grunde Quatsch ist, denn der Akzent verrät einen ja doch.
#138AuthorCalifornia81 (642214) 22 Jan 11, 14:03
Comment
@126, Darth: Besonders hört man es an dem von Braunbärin angesprochenen s->sh. Außerdem an Wörtern, die mit o beginnen, z.B. office, da ist das o ganz un-englisch geschlossen. (Gibt es überhaupt englische Wörter, die mit einem geschlossenen o beginnen wie Ostern?)
#139Authortigger (236106) 22 Jan 11, 20:46
Comment
Meiner Erfahrung nach mit Englischsprechern im Deutschkurs gibt's gar kein geschlossenes o als Monophthong. Ich höre es immer als Diphtong ou, manchmal sogar als Triphthong eou.
#140Authormanni3 (305129) 22 Jan 11, 21:00
Comment
Im Falle von "v" im Englischen macht das deutsche Gehirn dann den Doppelsalto rückwärts: es denkt "v ist wie deutsches w" - doch schon kommt einem die andere Regel in die Quere: "und w ist wie u" - peng, schon hat man den Salat.

Das ist doch mal eine schöne allgemeinsprachliche Erklärung dessen, was sich hinter "Hyperkorrektur" verbirgt!

#141AuthorAngel_of_Anarchy (654309) 23 Jan 11, 19:30
Comment
Ich vertrete übrigens die kombinierte Schlechter-Unterricht-/Hyperkorrektur-These.

Zum Teil ist es so, wie Birgila beschrieben hat, aber es spielt schon auch eine Rolle, dass man im Englischunterricht nicht auf die korrekte Aussprache hingewiesen wird.

Ich hatte gottseidank eine gute Englisch-Lehrerin in der Grundschule, die uns den Unterschied erklärt hat. Als ich dann aufs Gymnasium kam, hatten viele Leute von anderen Schulen das wictim/wedgetable-W drauf, und es hat sie nie jemand darauf hingewiesen, dass es falsch ist.

Das kam dann erst wieder im Englisch-Leistungskurs in der 11. Klasse - ob das bei den Leuten, die nicht Englisch-Leistungskurs hatten, jemals noch mal angesprochen wurde, weiß ich nicht.

In der Uni kamen dann erneut Leute dazu, die es nie richtig gelernt hatten und die aus allen Wolken fielen, als die Dozenten sie darauf hinwiesen.

Die Tatsache, dass es sogar ein Vater, der Englischlehrer ist, falsch macht (siehe oben), scheint ja auf ein grundlegendes Problem im deutschen Englisch-Unterrichtt hinzuweisen.

(Und dann ist da vielleicht auch noch eine Portion typisch deutsche Besswerwisserei mit ihm Spiel ...)
#142AuthorAngel_of_Anarchy (654309) 23 Jan 11, 19:40
Comment
My absolute favourite under the topic of German speakers confusing v and w in English is the pre-recorded message on a mobile phone spoken in English but by a German woman:

"The number you are dialling is not away label."

What, I asked myself is an "away label"? Then it dawned on me. She meant "available"...
#143AuthorJ. Paul Murdock24 Jan 11, 17:23
Comment
Die kenn ich. Die sagt "away leble" :-)
#144AuthorBirgila/DE (172576) 25 Jan 11, 11:08
Comment
Also ehrlich gesagt, ärgert mich diese Diskussion ein wenig.

Ich habe Englisch in der Schule gelernt und schlage mich damit eben so durch. Die allermeisten von Euch sprechen mit Sicherheit zehnmal besser als ich. Aber: JEDER, der eine fremde Sprache spricht, ist auf den guten Willen seines Gegenübers angewiesen. Und das gilt für die MEISTEN von Euch.

Ich persönlich habe, wenn ich Englisch spreche, ganz andere Probleme als w und v. Ich muss nach Wörtern suchen, die Grammatik beachten und nebenbei natürlich auch die Inhalte im Auge behalten. Eine fremde Sprache zu sprechen empfinde ich in gewisser Weise auch anstrengend.

Klar, man kann sich über die Aussprache von Ausländern lustig machen, muss es aber nicht.

Am liebsten unterhalte ich mich mit jemandem, der bereit ist, mich zu verstehen, auch wenn meine Aussprache nicht perfekt ist.

P.S. Ich sage auch manchmal "Windoof", und ich verstehe "Ick arbeite nackts" ohne zu grinsen.
#145AuthorFrau S aus S25 Jan 11, 12:14
Comment
@145: Mal abgesehen davon, dass das Amüsement über die fehlerhafte Aussprache englischer Laute durch Menschen mit Deutsch als Muttersprache nur einen sehr kleinen Teil der Diskussion in diesem Faden ausmacht und die meisten Beiträge Aussprachprobleme nur konstatieren und analysieren, ohne sich über sie lustig zu machen: Es ging dabei um Sprecher im professionellen Bereich, also teils um Menschen mit Sprechausbildung (Nachrichtensprecher, Lehrer), teils um Leute, die von großen Unternehmen (hier: einer Mobilfunkgesellschaft) dafür eingesetzt werden, englische Texte zu sprechen. In diesem Bereich darf man nach meiner Überzeugung auch ein Aussprachevermögen erwarten, das über die Fremdsprachenbeherrschung von Otto Normalverbraucher deutlich hinausgeht. Bei Lehrern liegt das wohl auf der Hand, und auch bei Wirtschaftsunternehmen, gerade im Kommunikationsbereich, sollte das selbstverständlich sein. Die lassen sich ihre Werbebroschüren ja auch nicht vom Pförtner entwerfen.

Außerhalb des Bereichs von Ausbildung und Beruf ist es doch ohnehin jedem selbst überlassen, ob sich er überhaupt mit einer Fremdsprache konfrontieren will.

#146AuthorCro-Mignon (751134) 25 Jan 11, 13:11
Comment
#146:
Ich kann beim flüchtigen Lesen des Ursprungsbeitrages keinen Hinweis auf professionelle Sprecher erkennen.
#147AuthorNico25 Jan 11, 13:20
Comment
@147: Sowohl in Beitrag #145 wie in meinem war nicht vom Ursprungsbeitrag, sondern von der Diskussion (in diesem Faden) die Rede.
#148AuthorCro-Mignon (751134) 25 Jan 11, 13:22
i Only registered users are allowed to post in this forum