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Topicquire (alternate spelling of choir)5 replies    
Comment
A question for UK native speakers....

I've seen the spelling "quire" for "choir". I believe it's a British spelling. (It's not used at all in the US.)

Is "quire" still used in the UK? Or is it obsolete?

Authoreric (new york) (63613) 21 Feb 12, 19:22
Comment
As in a group of singers? Never seen "quire" in that context - or, I think, in any other.

But, related discussion: Ostchor

and the rest of the LEO archive on "quire": http://dict.leo.org/forum/alphabeticIndex.php?postBack=alphabeticindex&lp=ende&l... ][0][text][0]=quire&selectbutton=Suche
#1AuthorKinkyAfro (587241) 21 Feb 12, 19:33
Comment
Ich habe es noch nie für die singende Gruppe Menschen gesehen - eher für die architektonischen Gegebenheiten siehe http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choir_%28architecture%29
#2AuthorLady Grey (235863) 21 Feb 12, 19:36
Comment
Definitely obsolete. Still in BE use , however, in order to convey an "antique" effect eg a local choir specialises in 18th/19th century church music of a certain sort and calls itself the Purbeck Quire.
#3AuthorEcgberht (469528) 21 Feb 12, 23:49
Comment
It famously occurs in a rubric in the Book of Common Prayer (following the Third Collect in the Order for Morning Prayer, I think): "In quires and places where they sing, here followeth the anthem." (It is about as obsolete as 'followeth'.)

"In quires and places..." has been used as the title of at least one recording of choral music. Perhaps that was where eric saw it.
#4Authorescoville (237761) 22 Feb 12, 07:58
Comment
Perhaps that was where eric saw it.

No, it's a spelling that I've see occasionally, here and there.
#5Authoreric (new york) (63613) 22 Feb 12, 17:54
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