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Subject

ex-Job

21 replies    
Sources
Beside the reception desk stood a fit looking man with brown skin, black hair and a good quality off-the-peg suit. Possibly Indonesian, I thought. He also managed the trick of looking both alert and bored out of his skull at the same time – ex-Job, ex-military, ex-intelligence – something like that.
Comment
Bedeutet ex-Job hier einfach nur, dass er vorher einen anderen Job hatte, oder gibt es eine andere Bedeutung?
Authorsmalt (709026) 11 Jan 17, 13:42
Comment
The fact that the word is capitalised means it probably refers to a particular assignment.
#1AuthorPipper (917363) 11 Jan 17, 13:47
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Ist "Job" da tatsächlich großgeschrieben?

Edit: Ah, synchron zumindest auf derselben Spur. :-)
#2AuthorCalifornia81 (642214) 11 Jan 17, 13:47
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Ja, 'Job' ist im Text groß geschrieben. Einen Hinweis, dass er einer bestimmten Beschäftigung nachging gibt es nicht.
#3Authorsmalt (709026) 11 Jan 17, 13:51
Comment
Der Rest der Aufzählung lässt darauf schließen, dass auch der "Job" etwas in Richtung Militär-, Geheim- ,Sicherheitsdienst oder Polizeiarbeit gewesen sein könnte.

In welchem Land spielt das? Gibt es dort vielleicht eine bekannte Sicherheitsfirma, die Job heißt (oder so abgekürzt wird)? Oder eine bestimmte Polizeieinheit, die offiziell oderl umgangssprachlich so genannt wird?
#4AuthorGaleazzo (259943) 11 Jan 17, 14:15
Comment
Der Rest der Aufzählung lässt darauf schließen, dass auch der "Job" etwas in Richtung Militär-, Geheim- ,Sicherheitsdienst oder Polizeiarbeit gewesen sein könnte.

In welchem Land spielt das? Gibt es dort vielleicht eine bekannte Sicherheitsfirma, die Job heißt (oder so abgekürzt wird)? Oder eine bestimmte Polizeieinheit, die offiziell oderl umgangssprachlich so genannt wird?
#5AuthorGaleazzo (259943) 11 Jan 17, 14:16
Comment
Leo hatte Schluckauf, sorry.
#6AuthorGaleazzo (259943) 11 Jan 17, 14:17
Comment
"Sonderauftrag" kommt mir dazu in den Sinn ...
#7Authorno me bré (700807) 11 Jan 17, 14:19
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#5 Die Geschichte spielt in England.

Vielen Dank für eure Ideen.
#8Authorsmalt (709026) 11 Jan 17, 14:22
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Le Carre has gone off the boil now, although his earlier books were outstandingly good. The BBC's productions Tinker Tailor, Smiley's People and A Perfect Spy are a reminder that at one time the BBC did really good stuff, but that was before the PC and CP idiots took charge.
As for Le Carre bending the truth. Being 'ex job' himself he at least knows what truth he's bending and how far it will go.

Ich nehme an, es ist entweder MI-5 oder MI-6, aber im Detail kenne ich mich nicht aus.
#9AuthorGibson (418762) 11 Jan 17, 14:41
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Ja, Le Carré hat für MI5 und MI6 gearbeitet, beides würde ich als Geheimdienst (meinetwegen auch Nachrichtendienst) bezeichnen.
Aber was unterscheidet dann "Job" a la MI5/MI6 von "intelligence" ?

#10Authorlingua franca (48253) 11 Jan 17, 15:32
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Böse Zungen behaupten ja, "secret service" und "intelligence" sweien "mutually exclusive" ...
#11AuthorB.L.Z. Bubb (601295) 11 Jan 17, 15:40
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Schon klar:-)
Dann wäre das wohl:
"– Ex-Geheimdienstler, Ex-Militär, Ex-Intelligenzler –" ;-)
#12Authorlingua franca (48253) 11 Jan 17, 15:55
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Wieso Intelligenzler? Die Intllektuellen bzw. die Angehörigen der Intellegentsia sind etwas anderes.
#13Authormbshu (874725) 11 Jan 17, 15:59
Sources
"Also the biggest point in his favour is he is ex 'JOB' and so knows how things work in policing."
Comment
Dieses Zitat deutet auf 'Job' als Polizei-Verwendung hin.
vllt Joint Operation Irgendwas
#14Authorwor (335727) 11 Jan 17, 18:21
Comment
Vielleicht "ex-Profi" oder so?
Ich verstehe das so, dass er wohl früher Polizist/Militär/Geheimdienstler/wasauchimmer war und jetzt ist er in Rente oder selbständig, jedenfalls nicht mehr offiziell für einen dieser Vereine tätig.
#15AuthorQual der Wal (877524) 11 Jan 17, 19:19
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I would take it to mean ex-CID / police detective (assuming that is the narrator's job).
#16AuthorMikeE (236602) 11 Jan 17, 19:37
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(assuming that is the narrator's job).

Das ist ja das, was nicht klar ist.
#17AuthorGibson (418762) 11 Jan 17, 20:19
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#17
I thought we knew that the narrator was a policeman.
I had assumed he was CID, but I now understand he is actually a PC cum wizard.
I had a vague memory that private detectives who had been in the police force (of the Matula type) were sometimes referred to as "ex-job" by police officers.
#18AuthorMikeE (236602) 11 Jan 17, 22:41
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Der Satz ist aus "The Hanging Tree", dem neuesten Peter-Grant-Roman von Ben Aaronovich (oder so).

Und ja, der Erzähler ist Constable Peter Grant (ob er noch PC oder schon DC ist, weiß ich grad nicht) ;-)

Beim ersten Lesen hatte ich das "ex Job" auch als "Ex-Bulle" verstanden.
#19AuthorB.L.Z. Bubb (601295) 12 Jan 17, 08:26
Comment
I would have thought it was quite literal: he was 'out of' a job.

That was not what I thought when I saw the title of the thread, but before I'd read it. Then I thought it was like 'ex-parrot' or 'ex-wife', and meant 'former job', as in 'The guy who's got my ex-job / married my ex-wife is a real clown.'
#20Authorescoville (237761) 12 Jan 17, 09:22
Sources
Trueman threw himself back in the chair and nodded. 'I do. Buckland was ex-job.'
'A copper?' Horton asked surprised. Cantelli hadn't mentioned that.

'Not for long. He did his probation, but didn't last twelve months after that. He went into private investigations for a while, then turned up as a security officer in 2001, when Peter Ebury shot him.'


Ian shrugged and nodded.
"I haven't told any bugger that I'm ex job, but that's only because I didn't feel like answering questions about myself. I don't think anyone would really care," Ian assured his friend.
"It's not that, mate. There's another reason. I'll tell you more later, but for now it's vitally important that no bugger knows what I do, ok?"
Allan was insistent that the big ex-policeman take this seriously.


"Yes. Ex-job, aren't you?"
"Like every other private licence, yes, I used to be a copper."
Comment
I agree with MikeE: I too have come across this as meaning "former police officer".

Here's a few Google Books hits to support that theory. There's more where that came from.

This one is also interesting, from a forum frequented by Prison Officers in the UK:

"Am currently serving in the cops but am looking at applying to HMPS for a Prison Officer role to facilitate moving home to the other end of the country. I can't get a move within the cops as the local forces aren't taking transferees so am looking at the Prison Service.

Can anyone on here advise if this is common? Some of my colleagues have said it'd be dangerous for ex-police to join as a Prison Officer but I wouldn't be advertising the fact and I'm sure there must be some ex-job working as Officers?"


#21AuthorJalapeño (236154) 12 Jan 17, 09:34
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