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gentle VS tender

[Adjektiv]
16 Antworten    
Quellen
zärtlich 
zärtlich sein, insbesondere in einer Liebesbeziehung - es geht um die Adjektive
Kommentar
Do both words mean exactly the same?
Do they refer only to the body or to e.g. a situation sb. created as well?
Is tender used nowadays or do I know it only from the past century?

Ich entschuldige mich hiermit vorträglich für alle orthographischen und grammatikalischen Fehler!
Verfasserasmo123 (256240) 20 Mär 17, 18:46
Kommentar
gentle has a bit less of an emotional aspect than tender does, IMO. You can be gentle with someone or something without having an emotional involvement, but when you're tender, it usually means there's some sort of emotional aspect to it.
#1VerfasserKai (236222) 20 Mär 17, 18:58
Kommentar
"gentle" does not necessarily involve a relationship - you can be gentle when doing something *edit* like Kai said.
#2Verfasserpenguin (236245) 20 Mär 17, 19:00
Kommentar
Die beiden Wörter sind m.E. nicht vollkommen bedeutungsgleich. gentle geht eher Richtung sanft, tender eher Richtung sachte oder zart (ein gutes Steak kann z.B. auch tender sein ;o)) Für Zärtlichkeiten in Liebesbeziehungen passt vermutlich meist eher tender, es sei denn, es soll auch darauf hingewiesen sein, dass jemand zerbrechlich ist und daher besonders sanft und vorsichtig angefasst wird.

Edit: Und was meine Vorredner geschrieben haben.

 
Ich weiß nicht, was du mit der Frage meinst, ob die Wörter sich nur auf den Körper oder auch auf eine Situation beziehen können. Eine Umarmung kann z.B. auch tender sein, oder auch gentle, meintest du das?

Ob Du tender nur aus älteren Texten kennst, weißt nur Du allein, aber es wird auch heutzutage gebraucht (nicht nur bei Steaks ;o))
#3VerfasserDragon (238202) 20 Mär 17, 19:04
Quellen
"Ich kann derb und zärtlich sein - jedes zu seiner Zeit."
Maybe I should have posted the sentence in the beginning… Sry
Kommentar
> es sei denn, es soll auch darauf hingewiesen sein, dass jemand zerbrechlich ist
> und daher besonders sanft und vorsichtig angefasst wird
:D Nein, nicht zerbrechlich.

Eine "sanfte Berührung" wäre dann "gentle/tender touch" - je nachdem ob ein Arbeitskollege auf sich aufmerksam machen möchte oder ob der Partner Gänsehaut hervorrufen will, korrekt?

> Eine Umarmung kann z.B. auch tender sein, oder auch gentle, meintest du das?
Ja

> but when you're tender, it usually means there's some sort of emotional aspect to it
Yes, this is what I was looking for.

"I can be rude and tender - each at the right time." ("… fitting moment"? sounds odd to me)
german would be:
"Ich kann derb und zärtlich sein - jedes im passenden Moment." Also nicht gleichzeitig. ;-)
#4Verfasserasmo123 (256240) 20 Mär 17, 20:21
Kommentar
'rude and tender' kann man problemslos zur gleichen Zeit sein ;-) Ich glaube, du meinst 'rough'.
#5VerfasserGibson (418762) 20 Mär 17, 21:18
Kommentar
I can be rough or gentle, depending on the occasion/subject to whim.
#6Verfasserlaalaa (238508) 20 Mär 17, 21:25
Kommentar
Two examples from Lawrence (Lady Chatterley's Lover), can do something to illustrate some of the points already made, both however being used in the context of human intimacy:

He laid his hand on her shoulder, and softly, gently, it began to travel down the curve of her back, blindly, with a blind stroking motion, to the curve of her crouching loins. And there his hand softly, softly, stroked the curve of her flank, in the blind instinctive caress.

...

In the ebbing she realized all the loveliness. Now all her body clung with tender love to the unknown man, and blindly to the wilting penis, as it so tenderly, frailly, unknowingly withdrew, after the fierce thrust of its potency. As it drew out and left her body, the secret, sensitive thing, she gave an unconscious cry of pure loss, and she tried to put it back. It had been so perfect! And she loved it so!

The words might be interchanged; but "tender" and "tenderly" have connotations of passion that "gentle"/"gently" tend not to have. There's something of restraint about "gentle," something more proactive in "tender" (even in withdrawal ...) ...
#7VerfasserBion (1092007) 20 Mär 17, 22:14
Kommentar
Thanks for making it clear that "tender" is the right word.

@ #5
> 'rude and tender' kann man problemslos zur gleichen Zeit sein ;-) Ich glaube, du meinst 'rough'.

LEO "rude" -> "grob, unanständig …"In sofern hast du recht, man kann unverschämt (und) zärtlich sein.
I'm not sure about the way "rough" would differ. I have the impression that "rough" is rather/completely negative - for both persons.

@ #6
So it has to be "or" - and not "and" as I would say in German?
#8Verfasserasmo123 (256240) 20 Mär 17, 23:48
Kommentar
I have the impression that "rough" is rather/completely negative - for both persons.

Ich verstehe nicht, was du meinst. Weder 'rude' noch 'derb' sind positiv. Was genau willst du denn sagen?
#9VerfasserGibson (418762) 21 Mär 17, 00:12
Kommentar
Some people like it rough: rough sex, for instance. Others like "roughing it," i.e. doing without the usual amenities or luxuries (primitive camping, for instance). "Rough" is not always a negative thing.
#10VerfasserKai (236222) 21 Mär 17, 01:23
Kommentar
Still in the dark as to what EXACTLY you want to convey.
To my ears, "rude and tender" makes no sense.

Rude would describe someone that is disrespectful, has no manners, is inconsiderate (shouting, jumping the queue, pushing people out of the way, swearing, bullying).

"Tender" is a minefield. Someone saying: "I'm tender/ I feel tender" about themselves will not shower you with caresses but is probably describing the aftermath of a heavy drinking session or a hard-fought rugby game.

To collocate the two terms makes no sense, even with an "or" in between.

I'd still be sticking with

"I can be rough or gentle, depending on the occasion/subject to whim" 

for what I guess is your *sigh* context.
#11Verfasserlaalaa (238508) 21 Mär 17, 07:27
Kommentar
@ #9 That depends on the person.
@ #10 It's ment to be used for describing people. But I see what you mean. (^)
@ #11 Collating? I am ware of the fact that "rude" and "tender" are usually mutually exclusive - giving a broad spectrum is what I intend. Would using "Ich kann trampeln und schleichen - je nachdem…" in a sentence make no sense as well?
According to LEO "rude" also means "unanständig" that's not always negative. Does "rough" include "unanständig"?
"to be tender", as said I would use it as "zu jemandem zärtlich sein". What would be the right word then?

@ laalaa & all Yes, still dating website. I intentionally omitted that because it should not play a role at all. However, I described the setting by saying "in einer Liebesbeziehung".
Is what I want to express so hard to guess? Some more examples then…

* One brother takig the others neck in his armpit. Yes, this can happen without meaning to hurt the other.
* Yanking your partner around or holding on all-out and giving a kiss.
* Being in public and touching the pecs/butt/… of the other person not really caring if somebody is watching.
* Pushing (beiseiteschieben) of other persons decisively w/o asking to move first.
* Using vulgar language (in public).
* There is a scene in BigBangTheory where Sheldon tells his girlfriend that he needs to punish her by spanking her. She get's excited (doesn't show it) and says "I was a bad, bad girl." because this would be one of the first encounter of sexual proximity. This is not exactly what I mean but maybe it shows the direction.
I wasn't mentioning "bad boy" earlier - would you say that to a guy (not ironically)?
#12Verfasserasmo123 (256240) 21 Mär 17, 12:16
Kommentar
Oh soz, I failed to see in my crystal ball that we are STILL on dating sites.
"Is what I want to express so hard to guess?"
I didn't know LEO was a quiz show.

Collocating, not collating: A word that is habitually juxtaposed with another with a frequency greater than chance - e.g. chalk and cheese.

FWIW, I don't think there is one sole word for what you want to say, some of the scenarios you are describing are rough, some rude and some naughty.

PS: Are you sure your name is not opine? Just curious...
#13Verfasserlaalaa (238508) 21 Mär 17, 13:51
Kommentar
> I didn't know LEO was a quiz show.
Neither did I. So I was right - my request was obvious. ;-)

Now, that aside. Thanks for making it clear that what I want to describe can not be expressed in one word.


@ #10 - you was answering #9 … I just got that lately. :D
#14Verfasserasmo123 (256240) 21 Mär 17, 14:00
Kommentar
opine?
If that's a user here, no it is not my name. I am asmo123 and just that in this forum.
#15Verfasserasmo123 (256240) 23 Mär 17, 23:18
Kommentar
Tender is associated with affection and feeling
Gentle is descriptive of temperament, how someone acts.

"The gentleness between the lovers showed tenderness"
#16VerfasserA_monkey_in_a_silk (973106) 24 Mär 17, 08:08
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