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    bail out (Wasser)

    Comment
    Laut Macmillan Dictionary bedeutet bail out in Bezug auf Wasser:
    "to empty water from a boat using a small container" (https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionar...)
    Meriam-Webster dagegen sagt nichts von einem "container":
    "to clear (water) from a boat by dipping and throwing over the side —usually used with out" (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bail)

    Wie ist die übliche Verwendung hier? Wird bei bail out immer angenommen, dass ein Gegenstand zum Ausschöpfen verwendet wird, oder ist der Ausdruck auch passend, wenn die bloßen Hände verwendet werden?

    Speziell schreibe ich im Moment an einer Geschichte (auf Englisch, da es für ein Forum ist, das als Umgangssprache nur Englisch verwendet), in der meine beiden Protagonisten ihr Boot mit bloßen Händen ausschöpfen müssen, weil es sonst sinkt. Ist bail out hier der richtige Ausdruck oder wäre etwas anderes besser (scoop water vielleicht?)?

    Danke für Eure Hilfe.

    P.S.: Bin ich im richtigen Forum, oder gehört das eher in Übersetzung korrekt?
    AuthorSinitrena (427410) 27 Aug 15, 06:23
    Comment
    This ought to clarify things for you: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bail
    Definition of BAIL: a container used to remove water from a boat

    I'd use "scoop (by hand)" in your context
    #1Author dude (253248) 27 Aug 15, 06:38
    Comment
    Collins sagt:

    to bale out - (Wasser aus einem Boot) herausschöpfen

    Oxforddict.:

    bail out (BE also bale out) [with object]
    1. Scoop water out of (a ship or boat): the first priority is to bail out the boat with buckets
    1.1. Scoop (water) out of a ship or boat: I started to use my hands to bail out the water
    #2Author MiMo (236780) 27 Aug 15, 06:43
    Comment
    #2 sounds right to me.
    #3Author Jurist (US) (804041) 27 Aug 15, 07:05
    Comment
    I would add that the spelling 'bale' in this context is very unusual even in BE.

    I'd reserve it for bales of hay (and what you do to hay to make bales), or for the now archaic noun behind 'baleful'.
    #4Author escoville (237761) 27 Aug 15, 09:15
    Comment
    Danke für die Antworten. Das hilft mir weiter.

    Es scheint also, dass bail auch funktioniert, wenn die Hände benutzt werden. Auf Nummer sicher gehe ich aber wohl mit scoop.

    Danke nochmal.
    #5AuthorSinitrena (427410) 27 Aug 15, 20:52
    Comment
    They can bail out the boat, by scooping out water with a bucket or scoop, say, or if necessary with their hands. But to say scoop out water is a poor substitute when the meaning is bail (out).

    verb (used with object)
    1. to dip (water) out of a boat, as with a bucket.
    2. to clear of water by dipping (usually followed by out):
    to bail out a boat.
    #6Author Jurist (US) (804041) 28 Aug 15, 00:36
    Comment
    I'm not sure I understand the problem. "bail" usually implies some sort of bucket or other "container" or "tool" with which to haul out the water. Look at the word's etymology:
    http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_i...
    bail (v.1)
    "to dip water out of," 1610s, from baile (n.) "small wooden bucket" (mid-14c.), from nautical Old French baille "bucket, pail," from Medieval Latin *bajula (aquae), literally "porter of water," from Latin bajulare "to bear a burden" (see bail (n.1)).

    Sure, you can scoop out the water with some sort of tool too, but to me at least "scoop" works better when it's done with hands than "bail" does. At the very least there's nothing wrong with "scooping" and it seems to imply the "effort" of doing it with one's hands more than "bailing it out" would.
    #7Author dude (253248) 28 Aug 15, 00:49
    Comment
    Sure, you can scoop out the water with some sort of tool too
    That's true. I guess it's why we have utensils called "scoops."

    If I had too much water in my boat and I didn't have a bucket on board, I don't think I would ask people to scoop it out. That sounds too laid-back to me. I'd tell them to start bailing.
    #8Author SD3 (451227) 28 Aug 15, 07:34
    Comment
    Surely 'scoop' refers to the action, while 'bail' refers to action+purpose. In that sense, bailing entails scooping, but not vice versa.

    (That does not extend to the metaphorical sense. We don't talk about a Greek scoop-out. That I suppose is because while the end-purpose is there -- to save a sinking ship -- the scooping action isn't.))
    #9Author escoville (237761) 28 Aug 15, 08:39
    Comment
    We don't talk about a Greek scoop-out. I think one could argue that point, actually, the way things have been going. But if, for instance, you sat in your bathtub and were moving water from the tub to, say, the nearby toilet with your hands, would you call that bailing or scooping?

    Re #8: sure, if you're in the boat and panicking, "scoop!" would be the wrong command, but I don't think that's the OP's context. Seems to me she's not in that situation herself; she's describing it as an outside observer. Anyway, that's just my opinion.
    #10Author dude (253248) 28 Aug 15, 14:22
    Comment
    #10 sure, if you're in the boat and panicking, "scoop!" would be the wrong command, but I don't think that's the OP's context. Seems to me she's not in that situation herself; she's describing it as an outside observer. Anyway, that's just my opinion.

    Genaugenommen geht es um beides (ich hätte das vielleicht gleich klarer sagen sollen): Zum einen um eine recht neutrale Beschreibung durch einen unabhängigen Erzähler, zum anderen um den Dialog meiner beiden Protagonisten.
    #11AuthorSinitrena (427410) 28 Aug 15, 20:48
     
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