•  
  • Betrifft

    browse/surf the web

    Kommentar
    Is there a difference in meaning? My text uses 'browse the web' consistently. I would translate that as 'im Netz surfen' but I was suddenly worried that there might be a subtle difference between the two. Any experts around?
    VerfasserGibson (418762) 19 Okt. 16, 16:10
    Kommentar
    Siehe Wörterbuch: browse

    LEO bietet sogar die Übersetzung so an.

    #1Verfasserwaltherwithh (554696) 19 Okt. 16, 16:15
    Kommentar
    Das ist schön, beantwortet aber meine Frage nicht. Nichts gegen LEO (wie auch; ich verbringe mein halbes Leben hier), aber bei Detailfragen ist der Löwe nicht immer 100% zuverlässig.
    #2VerfasserGibson (418762) 19 Okt. 16, 16:48
    Kommentar
    To surf implies to me to (even) less serious perusal than to browse. Both generally imply moving from website to website, but browsing seems to me to imply a more lingering consumption of at least parts of the websites in question, whereas surfing is more skimming over the surface at a faster rate of knots :-)

    Technically, almost all human, as opposed to automatic, robot, consumption of web content is mediated through software called web browsers, so I guess that could all go under the heading of browsing. (Software robots are often said to crawl the web rather than browsing or surfing, typically proceeding systematically through websites leaving no link unvisited.)
    #3Verfasseramw (532814) 21 Okt. 16, 00:16
    Kommentar
    Maybe it's just splitting hairs, but to me surfing implies fun and carefree, entertainment; browsing is more directed at something, with at least a vague goal in mind. That's my take on it, if I was forced to make a distinction.
    #4Verfasserwupper (354075) 21 Okt. 16, 00:35
    Kommentar
    I think #3 and #4 sum it up well.

    The dictionary supports the conjecture that surf implies searching the web casually or for amusement. It defines this term as "to look for information or other interesting things on the Internet."

    Browse, on the other hand, can mean "to access (a network) by means of a browser," but it can also be used to connote "a) to skim through a book reading passages that catch the eye; b) to look over or through an aggregate of things casually especially in search of something of interest."

    So the distinction is not hard and fast.
    #5VerfasserBob C. (254583) 21 Okt. 16, 03:07
    Kommentar
    Also agree with #3 and 4.
    Maybe it helps to think of the original meanings of the words. Cows and other animals "browse" - looking for, and finding, food. "surfing" is a sport - just for fun, for most surfers.
    #6Verfassermikefm (760309) 21 Okt. 16, 09:34
    Kommentar
    Thank you for all your input. But that leaves me with the question: How would I get that into German? We don't really have 'browse' (that's why I used 'surfen'). Not that it matters that much; the difference, as you said, is small, and anyway, the translation is at the client's by now ;).
    But I'm still interested.

    'recherchieren'? But that's almost too serious, isn't it? There's 'stöbern', of course, but in German you don't really use that with the Internet in my experience.
    #7VerfasserGibson (418762) 21 Okt. 16, 10:57
    Kommentar
    Gibson, what's wrong with that good old German verb "browsen"? ;-)

    #8Verfassermikefm (760309) 21 Okt. 16, 11:09
    Kommentar
    I have to say that that's a new one for me. Never heard it in German and would suggest that we adapt the spelling: im Internet brausen. Especially in summer ;-)
    #9VerfasserGibson (418762) 21 Okt. 16, 11:39
    Kommentar
    That's a really fizzing idea. :-)
    #10Verfassermikefm (760309) 21 Okt. 16, 11:42
    Kommentar
    Wie wäre es mit "im Internet recherchieren"? Das gibt es z.B. als Arbeitsauftrag in der Schule: "Recherchiert im Internet nach Informationen über das Wattenmeer" ...
    #11VerfasserRaudona (255425) 21 Okt. 16, 11:59
    Kommentar
    Raudona, siehe #7. Manchmal kann das eine gute Alternative sein, das glaube ich auch, aber oft 'browsed' man auch eher ziellos, oder? Und umgekehrt würde ich 'Recherchiert im Internet'  nicht mit 'browse the web for information' sagen, sondern etwas wie: Find information on... oder so was.
    #12VerfasserGibson (418762) 21 Okt. 16, 12:56
    Kommentar
    Wie wäre es mit "im Internet recherchieren"?
    Das wäre gezieltes Browsen, denke ich?

    Edith sagt "Ha!" ;-)
    #13Verfassermikefm (760309) 21 Okt. 16, 12:57
    Kommentar
    Oder vielleicht "im Internet stöbern"?
    #14VerfasserFrank HKT (247916) 21 Okt. 16, 13:54
    Kommentar
    Gibson, ich wollte "recherchieren" einfach in den Kontext stellen.

    Es ist m.E. auch ein Unterschied, ob man eine Tätigkeit beschreibt oder einen Arbeitsauftrag gibt. Ich gebe dir Recht: "Browse the web for information" wäre wohl eher ungewöhnlich. Im heutigen Kontext müsste man wohl sowieso bei einem schulischen Rechercheauftrag gar nicht betonen, dass die Informationssuche im Internet stattfinden soll; eher geben Lehrkräfte Anweisungen wie "Gib mindestens zwei gedruckte Quellen an", damit die SchülerInnen überhaupt auf die Idee kommen, etwas anderes als das Internet zu verwenden ...
    #15VerfasserRaudona (255425) 21 Okt. 16, 14:03
     
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  
 
 
  • Pinyin
     
  • Tastatur
     
  • Sonderzeichen
     
  • Lautschrift
     
 
 
:-) automatisch zu 🙂 umgewandelt