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    family = ein Familienmitglied / Angehörige(r) ?

    Topic

    family = ein Familienmitglied / Angehörige(r) ?

    Comment

    the Queen was the first family Harry called after Lilibet’s birth

    https://twitter.com/scobie/status/14025203113...


    Wie häufig/akzeptiert ist eine solche Verwendung von family im Sinne einer Einzelperson?


    Auch LEO kennt family -- der Angehörige | die Angehörige, ich finde eine derartige Verwendung allerdings allerdings nicht in den großen einsprachigen Wörterbüchern (Oxford-Lexico, CALD, Collins, MW, AHD) verzeichnet.

    Author lingua franca (48253)  14 Jun 21, 12:47
    Comment

    You're / he's family usw. habe ich oft gehört - die Verwendung für Einzelpersonen ist zumindest informell üblich.

    #1Author mbshu (874725)  14 Jun 21, 12:55
    Comment

    I'd say it's rather casual, almost too casual for this context, but, yes, it's fine. I'd say, "He's the only family I have", or "he's family", meaning he's a family member or relative.

    #2AuthorJaymack (805011) 14 Jun 21, 14:38
    Comment
    Danke Euch. Wollen andere noch etwas beitragen?
    #3Author lingua franca (48253) 21 Jun 21, 00:01
    Comment

    Hmm. I agree with the examples in #1 and #2, and I suppose the singular noun Familienmitglied would be one way to translate them.


    However, I don't really think it explains the underlying syntax, because I don't think the English word is really being used as a noun. It feels to me more like an adjective, because after all, it's not countable. You could never use the indefinite article; we do not say 'She's *a family.'


    So to understand the English syntax, you might need to make up an adjective like 'familienverwandt,' or else use a paraphrase like 'sie ist Teil der Familie' or 'sie gehört der Familie.'


    And I'm not actually sure I even approve of the tweet in the opening post, which probably should have read 'she was the first relative / the first family member he called.' Again, I don't think I would use 'family' in this sense with an article at all. To me, the first family is 'die erste Familie' (bzw. the First Family / die Erste Familie meaning the occupants of the White House).


    Not sure if that helps, but fwiw.


    (OT: BTW, I can only imagine that the queen's heart probably sank at the use of her very informal childhood name as a formal given name, not to mention the pairing of it with the name of a daughter-in-law from whom she had been estranged. Why they didn't just have the good sense to name the child Lily and say that it reminded them of Elizabeth, I can't imagine.)


    #4Author hm -- us (236141)  21 Jun 21, 04:18
    Comment

    Anything novel usage that leads to misunderstanding at first reading, as this does, is not acceptable in my view.

    #5Author Martin--cal (272273) 21 Jun 21, 05:26
     
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