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    brimstone - sulphur

    Kommentar
    Is there a difference between "brimstone" and "sulfur"/"sulphur"? I thought that "brimstone" is the common term and "sulphur" the technical one. (Background: On the "Shrek"-DVD there is a little quiz about the movie, and one question is "What is the smelly odor at the dragon's castle? a) Sulfur b) Tar c) Brimstone." The correct answer is c), and a) is wrong.)
    Verfasserstefan <at>30 Apr. 02, 18:15
    Kommentar
    "Brimstone" is a dated word for "sulfur" and is almost solely used (in American) in a biblical context. The common/modern term is "sulfur".
    #1VerfasserRoy30 Apr. 02, 18:25
    Kommentar
    yes, there is a difference. "brimstone" is roughly the same as "flint (-stone)", a glassy mineral that gives off a spark( and a funny smell) when brought into sharp contact with steel (or another flint/brimstone). ItŽs the stuff that was used in some early front-loading guns to ignite the powder. Sulfur is an element occuring in various modifications (the best-known is "yellow sulfur"). This also has a distinctive smell, but it is quite different from the odour of brimstone.
    #2Verfasserducky30 Apr. 02, 18:30
    Kommentar
    #3VerfasserPeter02 Mai 02, 06:38
    Kommentar
    @ducky: Please a source of Your knowledge about brimstone as a mineral, it's interesting - I found "brimstone" only as a (old, biblical) synonym for sulphur (several sources in the net).
    #4Verfasserjmt08 Mai 02, 10:32
     
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