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Besonders an LEOs aus Schwaben ...

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Robert Burns

Scotland's best-known poet Robert Burns has been translated into numerous other languages, including German. Many of the translations were made during the second half of the 19th century.

I have heard that, because of the many similarities in culture, attitude and outlook between the two peoples/nations, German translations were, in fact, often rendered in Schwäbisch rather than Hochdeutsch.

I have never been able to locate any such Schwäbisch translations. If anyone can point me towards:
a) any online Burns works in Hochdeutsch
b) any translations in Schwäbisch, either online or on paper

I'd be grateful to hear from you.

AuthorBob (GB)10 Feb 04, 00:19
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sorry, can't help you with the swabian, but here's a low saxon (plattdütsch) translation and a few book references

http://www.kdkeller.de/deutscheweisen.html

http://www.sassisch.net/auld_lang_syne.htm

http://www.grainger.de/music/songs/auldlang.html


#1AuthorMarkus<de>10 Feb 04, 03:12
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@markus Thanks! I hadn't thought of plattdütsch, which was stupid of me because there must be very strong linguistic tes ("ick vertell di wat", etc).

Do you remember the "6-gear" thread, where Übersetzter was back-translated as oversetter? Following the second of your 3 links, I was intriqued to see that "translation" in nedderdüütsch/plattdüütsch is "Översetten".

There is nothing new under the sun!
#2AuthorBob (GB)10 Feb 04, 09:51
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try www.schwaebisch-englisch.de
#3AuthorGeierschnabel (335375) 30 May 07, 15:04
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