•  
  • Übersicht

    Sprachlabor

    I beg your pardon, I'm really sorry

    Betrifft

    I beg your pardon, I'm really sorry

    Kommentar
    Obviously there are several standard phrases to say you're sorry: Entschuldigung. Pardon. Enschuldigen Sie. Even the English word "Sorry".

    These standard phrases are used for everyday apologies, minor events, such as bumping into someone, or being a few minutes late for a meeting.

    What phrases are available when you want to indicate that you're very sorry, or to acknowledge that you've done something inappropriate and you know it and you want to be a little more formal about it. (You've missed an appointment entirely. You promised someone you would do something, and you didn't do it. You need to signal to your boss that you've done something wrong and you realize it's serious.)

    Suggestions?

    Thanks.
    Verfassereric (new york) (63613) 30 Apr. 10, 18:58
    Kommentar
    "Das tut mir wirklich / sehr / aufrichtig leid!"
    Und es kommt dabei auf Tonfall, Mimik und Gestik an.
    #1Verfassermanni3 (305129) 30 Apr. 10, 19:01
    Kommentar
    Die beschriebenen Situationen würden von mir auf ein "Das tut mir echt leid." oder "Das tut mir wirklich leid." hinauslaufen.

    Viel mehr normal und aufrichtig klingende Ausdrücke gibts kaum, ohne zu übertrieben oder gar lächerlich zu klingen.
    Z.B. Konstruktionen wie "Ich bitte vielmals um Entschuldigung." o.ä. klingen in meinen Augen eher ironisch und würden mir, wenn ich der Gegenüber wäre, eher ein Schmunzeln entlocken.
    #2VerfasserRJo30 Apr. 10, 19:06
    Kommentar
    Really? This is surprising; I thought 'Es tut mir leid' was for the other kind of 'sorry,' when something unfortunate has happened and you want to express sympathy, though it's not your fault and it has nothing to do with blame.
    #3Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 30 Apr. 10, 19:28
    Kommentar
    hm -- us: you mean das tut mir leid. Or you'd say "mein herzlichstes Beileid" then, if someone has died.

    This "I'm sorry (to hear that)" (in case you're not to blame) = es/ das tut mir leid, is not as common in Germany (IMO).
    #4VerfasserAnna_10022 (683244) 30 Apr. 10, 19:35
    Kommentar
    Okay, thanks ... I think.

    Maybe it would help to have a few specific examples?

    We're sorry you can't come tomorrow night; we'll miss you.
    I'm so sorry that your job is still so stressful. I wish I could do something to help.
    I was so sorry to hear that your grandmother had died.


    vs.

    I'm really sorry, but I just spilled paint all over your desk. It was totally my fault, I just wasn't watching what I was doing.
    I'm terribly sorry. I promised to write and I just haven't felt up to it, but I feel awful that I haven't kept in touch.
    I am so deeply sorry, ma'am, I can't think what made me refer to you as bigoted; it was really an unpardonable thing to say.
    #5Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 30 Apr. 10, 19:57
    Kommentar
    I want to follow up on what hm--us and Anna_10022 have said...

    "I'm sorry" has two separate meanings in English:

    1)
    - I express sympathy for something (I'm sorry your aunt died.)
    - I regret something or I'm unhappy to hear something. (I'm sorry that restaurant has closed.)

    or:
    (2) I did something wrong (or I'm responsible for something wrong) and I apologize. (I'm sorry I was late for the meeting. I'm sorry I hit you. I'm sorry my dog bit your daughter.)

    Maybe my original query wasn't sufficiently clear. I was referring to "I'm sorry" #2.

    #6Verfassereric (new york) (63613) 30 Apr. 10, 19:58
    Kommentar
    @hm -- us:

    We're sorry you can't come tomorrow night; we'll miss you.
    (Es ist) schade, dass du heute Abend nicht kommen kannst
    I'm so sorry that your job is still so stressful. I wish I could do something to help.
    Es tut mir leid für dich, dass dein Job, or perhaps simply Das ist aber blöd/ nicht schön, dass dein Job
    I was so sorry to hear that your grandmother had died.
    Mein herzliches Beileid/ Mitgefühl

    vs.

    I'm really sorry, but I just spilled paint all over your desk. It was totally my fault, I just wasn't watching what I was doing.
    Das tut mir so leid, das wollte ich nicht. Es war meine Schuld
    I'm terribly sorry. I promised to write and I just haven't felt up to it, but I feel awful that I haven't kept in touch.
    Es tut mir leid or Entschuldige (vielmals)
    I am so deeply sorry, ma'am, I can't think what made me refer to you as bigoted; it was really an unpardonable thing to say
    *g* Entschuldigen sie Frau X/ meine Dame. Ich weiss wirklich nicht.../ Es tut mir aufrichtig Leid, Frau X...


    Perhaps what I'm trying to say is that we don't overuse the I'm so sorry so much (just cultural difference, no offense at all. You Americans are just such polite wrappers ;) We Germans are polite in a different way. Often when an American says to me (after, e.g. I'd say that my job is still so annoying) I'm so sorry; and I'm thinking: what's that your fault? ;) Or simply: why are you so sorry all of a sudden, you barely know me.
    Simply because it's different in German. I'm getting used to it, and try my best to reciprocate to be as polite in AE culture.
    #7VerfasserAnna_10022 (683244) 30 Apr. 10, 20:08
    Kommentar
    "Das/Es tut mir furchtbar leid" comes into my mind, if you want to express that you are very sorry about e.g. forgetting something, making a mistake ... But it might be that this is an expression only used in Austria.
    #8VerfasserSachs (638558) 30 Apr. 10, 20:13
    Kommentar
    Okay, thank you, so it really does have both senses, but you don't use it as much.

    So to take up on eric's examples (we must have both been writing examples at the same time; his are more concise), would 'I'm sorry the restaurant has closed' be just in the 'Schade, dass ...' category?

    It's just that I feel I've tried that in contexts in German where 'Tut mir leid' didn't seem right, and 'Schade' wasn't right either.

    'Das ist blöd' is defintely different, but maybe that's the one I need to start remembering to use more.
    #9Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 30 Apr. 10, 20:21
    Kommentar
    I suggest you are very careful with using "Das ist blöd" for "sorry", it probably works sometimes, but using it in a wrong context could bring you into big troubles.
    #10VerfasserSachs (638558) 30 Apr. 10, 20:29
    Kommentar
    Almost :) If you'd be the waiter, and you'd tell just arriving guests that your restaurant is closed, you'd say: "Es tut mir leid, ich/ wir habe(n) schon geschlossen"; if you're the guest(s), and you arrive with door being already locked, you'd say: "schade, das restaurant ist schon geschlossen" Happy to give more examples if needed. Schade means disappointment over/ because of something. "Es ist so schade, dass Tante Gertrud das nicht mehr erlebt"= "It's so sad/ unfortunate, that aunt Gertrud is not here anymore (because she's dead) to experience this".
    Es ist so schade für euch, dass es auf eurem Ausflug gestern geregnet hat=I'm sorry that it was raining on your trip yesterday.
    #11VerfasserAnna_10022 (683244) 30 Apr. 10, 20:38
    Kommentar
    —> if you were the waiter, and you were telling

    I think eric meant more in the sense of closed for ever, folded, failed:

    I'm sorry that Chinese restaurant has closed. It had really good food, but apparently they couldn't ever make a profit.

    But that wasn't eric's real question.

    So even for the ones where it's really your fault, like

    I'm sorry I was late for the meeting.
    I'm sorry I hit you.
    I'm sorry my dog bit your daughter.


    the options are still mainly

    Das tut mir wirklich / sehr / aufrichtig leid!
    Das tut mir so leid, das wollte ich nicht.
    Entschuldige (vielmals) / Entschuldigen Sie


    but preferably not

    Ich bitte vielmals um Entschuldigung.

    ?
    #12Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 30 Apr. 10, 20:51
    Kommentar
    Zu Anna:

    Es ist so schade für euch, dass es auf eurem Ausflug gestern geregnet hat=I'm sorry that it was raining on your trip yesterday.

    Hier würde wieder passen: Das ist ja blöd, dass es auf eurem Ausflug geregnet hat. ;)

    Zu hm-us:

    "Ich bitte vielmals um Entschuldigung."
    - ist förmlicher oder wenn man einen wirklichen schlimmen Fehler begangen hat. Es kann aber aauch übertrieben wirken.

    #13VerfasserCreepin30 Apr. 10, 20:58
    Kommentar
    @hm -- us: I was more replying to your question then (:

    —> if you were the waiter, and you were telling

    I think eric meant more in the sense of closed for ever, folded, failed:

    I'm sorry that Chinese restaurant has closed. It had really good food, but apparently they couldn't ever make a profit.

    Schade


    But that wasn't eric's real question.

    So even for the ones where it's really your fault, like

    I'm sorry I was late for the meeting.
    I'm sorry I hit you.
    I'm sorry my dog bit your daughter.

    the options are still mainly

    Das tut mir wirklich / sehr / aufrichtig leid!
    Das tut mir so leid, das wollte ich nicht.
    Entschuldige (vielmals) / Entschuldigen Sie

    correct


    but preferably not

    Ich bitte vielmals um Entschuldigung.

    no, you could still say that. Although you more likely say that if you stepped on someone's foot


    ?

    Edit: quote Zu hm-us:

    "Ich bitte vielmals um Entschuldigung."
    - ist förmlicher oder wenn man einen wirklichen schlimmen Fehler begangen hat. Es kann aber aauch übertrieben wirken.
    don't understand, and don't agree. It is less powerful: Bitte um Entschuldigung=stepped on foot. Es tut mir so leid=spilled paint all over your new pants. Anna.
    #14VerfasserAnna_10022 (683244) 30 Apr. 10, 20:59
    Kommentar
    "Excuse me (pardon me), could you please remove your cart so I can get through"="Entschuldigen Sie, darf ich mal durch". "Would you please excuse me" (go to restroom)="Entschuldigen Sie mich bitte einen Moment"
    #15VerfasserAnna_10022 (683244) 30 Apr. 10, 21:05
    Kommentar
    "Ich bitte vielmals um Entschuldigung" würde ich nie im normalen Sprachgebrauch verwenden. Und wenn, dann ehrlich gesagt nur für schwerwiegende Fehler, zum Beispiel in einer schriftlichen bzw förmlichen Erklärung: "Ich bitte vielmals um Entschuldigung, dass ich handgreiflich geworden bin"
    Soweit für meinen Sprachgebrauch.
    #16VerfasserCreepin30 Apr. 10, 21:09
    Kommentar
    Still don't agree. Wouldn't be sufficient for me in case of real err, but only in a mild case (if I accidentally pushed you in a train). "Es tut mir leid", has much more empathy/ personal meaning.
    #17VerfasserAnna_10022 (683244) 30 Apr. 10, 21:12
    Kommentar
    Ok, since I am a younger one ;), I try to use short phrases in everyday life. For example: "Oh, (das) tut mir leid." oder: "Entschuldigung!"
    Longer expression I would only use in written form or if I have to give a clear statement to apologize for something. (Ich entschuldige mich vielmals für..., Ich bitte um Entschuldigung für.., Es tut mir aufrichtig leid, dass...)
    #18VerfasserCreepin30 Apr. 10, 21:21
    Kommentar
    "Verzeihung!" wurde auch noch nicht erwähnt, für ein kleines Missgeschick im Alltag. Das ist auch durchaus üblich.
    #19VerfasserCreepin30 Apr. 10, 21:30
    Kommentar
    Creepin, die Ausgangsfrage war: What phrases are available when you want to indicate that you're very sorry, or to acknowledge that you've done something inappropriate and you know it and you want to be a little more formal about it.

    Spezifiziert in #6: I did something wrong
    #20Verfassermanni3 (305129) 30 Apr. 10, 21:39
    Kommentar
    Ach, das ist alles so kompliziert! Mein Kopf tut mir weh! Ich ziehe meine Frage zurück!

    Zweifellos ist das Beste, niemals irgendetwas zu tun, was eine Entschuldigung benötigt! So lebe ich fortan.
    #21Verfassereric (new york) (63613) 01 Mai 10, 01:09
    Kommentar
    Ach, das ist alles so kompliziert! Mein Kopf tut mir weh! Ich ziehe meine Frage zurück!

    Zweifellos ist das Beste, niemals irgendetwas zu tun, was eine Entschuldigung benötigt! So lebe ich fortan.


    *lol* Keine Sorge, so schlimm ist es nicht. Hier im Faden wurden nur eine Menge Fragen beantwortet, die du gar nicht gestellt hattest, eric ;)

    Nochmal zu deinen ursprünglichen Beispielen:
    (You've missed an appointment entirely. You promised someone you would do something, and you didn't do it. You need to signal to your boss that you've done something wrong and you realize it's serious.)

    Ich würde sagen:
    "Das/Es tut mir wirklich total leid."
    "Das/Es tut mir total leid."
    "Das/Es tut mir wirklich leid."
    "Das/Es tut mir echt leid."
    "Das/Es tut mir echt total leid."
    "Oh je, das tut mir so leid, das hab ich total vergessen." (Betonung auf so)

    - also ganz einfach :) Je nach Situation kann man auch noch ein 'Entschuldigung' vorweg sagen, also dann "Entschuldigung, das tut mir ...etc"
    #22VerfasserToblerine01 Mai 10, 07:43
    Kommentar
    Ich möchte mich bei Ihnen/dir in aller Form entschuldigen.
    #23VerfasserStravinsky (637051) 01 Mai 10, 08:16
    Kommentar
    To add to the confusion: I often combine several ways of saying "I'm sorry":
    "Oh, Entschuldigung, tut mir leid..."

    "Entschuldigung" sounds very formal if you say what you are sorry for.
    For example you are late:
    "Entschuldigung." is fine.
    "Entschuldigen Sie die Verspätung." Is formal but ok for work life.
    "Tut mir leid, dass ich so spät komme." Can always be used.

    "Verzeihung" is only used alone.

    "Tut mir leid" can be used to apologize as well as to express sympathy.

    Filler words (as in #22: "total", "wirklich", "echt", "ehrlich" etc.) are used to emphasize and the tone of voice and the rate of speech can change the register.
    #24VerfasserLille Ellen (394423) 01 Mai 10, 10:49
    Kommentar
    @eric, #21:

    If you just say "Entschuldigung!", that's never wrong.
    #25Verfasserpenguin (236245) 01 Mai 10, 14:47
    Kommentar
    How about:

    Mensch, ich habe vielleicht Mist gebaut.

    But that's very informal!
    #26Verfasseropine (680211) 01 Mai 10, 15:08
    Kommentar
    @ opine
    I wouldn't use that, since people might think you're bragging about it. You could use it for telling people how badly you messed up something ("Ich hab' gestern vielleicht Mist gebaut, ich hab' das Auto zu Schrott gefahren...") but I wouldn't consider it as an apology.
    #27VerfasserKaeru (600677) 01 Mai 10, 15:29
    Kommentar
    @Kaeru,
    I see what you mean. I (myself) do look at it as a "form of apology", but you're right, it's not an official/proper apology.
    #28Verfasseropine (680211) 01 Mai 10, 15:54
    Kommentar
    I guess you could use it as an apology if you phrase it differently; but even with something like "Entschuldigung, da hab' ich wohl Mist gebaut." the focus is more on admitting you're guilty, not on the actual apology (at least to me, others might disagree).
    #29VerfasserKaeru (600677) 01 Mai 10, 16:01
    Kommentar
    The focus should be on the apology. Good explanation.
    #30Verfasseropine (680211) 01 Mai 10, 16:11
    Kommentar
    Ein paar Anmerkungen zu dem bisher Gesagten:

    - "Echt" würde ich in einem Entschuldigungssatz nur verwenden, wenn es einigermaßen formlos und umgangssprachlich klingen darf - oder alternativ nach 80er-Jahre-Psycho-Slang:
    "Du ey, das tut mir echt leid, ey, das mit deiner Oma, ey."

    - Die Frage, wann "schade" passt, ist m.E. für englische Muttersprachler noch am leichtesten zu durchschauen: Immer dann, wenn man "too bad" sagen könnte.
    Daraus wird auch schon deutlich, dass das als Entschuldigung im allgemeinen nicht geht und außerdem auf harmlose Sachverhalte beschränkt ist.

    - Kleine sprachliche Feinheit: "Ich entschuldige mich" ist gängig, genaugenommen aber kann nur der andere einen entschuldigen.
    Das mag als Korinthenkackerei empfunden werden, aber zumindest für schwerere Vergehen empfinde ich das "sich entschuldigen" als sehr unpassend. Da sollte man sich schon ein "um Entschuldigung/ Verzeihung bitten" abringen.
    Das lässt dem Gegenüber dann auch die Wahl, die Entschuldigung anzunehmen oder nicht. "Ich entschuldige mich" klingt so, als ob man sich eben mal selber reinwaschen könnte.


    Die Fragen aus #5 sind interessante Beispiele, an denen ich mich auch mal versuchen möchte:

    Nichtverschuldetes "sorry":

    We're sorry you can't come tomorrow night; we'll miss you.
    Das tut mir leid, dass du nicht kommen kannst...
    "We're sorry" wäre hier problemlos zu ersetzen mit "Too bad". Daher - siehe oben - auch möglich:
    Schade, dass du nicht kommen kannst...

    I'm so sorry that your job is still so stressful. I wish I could do something to help.
    Das tut mir leid zu hören, dass dein Job...
    Hier würde ich ein "zu hören" einschieben, denn das ist ja sowieso mitgedacht. Für "Schade" ist das eigentlich schon zu schwerwiegend.

    I was so sorry to hear that your grandmother had died.
    Das hat mir so leid getan zu hören, dass...
    "Schade" wäre hier nur in unemotionalen Sonderfällen denkbar, wenn jemand seine Großmutter nie kennengelernt hat oder sowas:
    "Schade, dass deine Großmutter gestorben ist, bevor du sie ausfindig machen konntest."

    Verschuldetes "sorry":

    I'm really sorry, but I just spilled paint all over your desk. It was totally my fault, I just wasn't watching what I was doing.
    Ach, das tut mir aber schrecklich leid; ich habe gerade Farbe über deinen ganzen Schreibtisch gekleckert. ...
    "Schrecklich" ist natürlich auch nur einigermaßen umgangssprachlich zu verwenden.

    I'm terribly sorry. I promised to write and I just haven't felt up to it, but I feel awful that I haven't kept in touch.
    Es tut mir so leid. Ich hatte versprochen...
    Ich bitte vielmals um Entschuldigung. ...
    Ich muss mich tausendmal entschuldigen. ...


    I am so deeply sorry, ma'am, I can't think what made me refer to you as bigoted; it was really an unpardonable thing to say.
    Ich muss Sie vielmals um Verzeihung bitten...
    Es tut mir sehr leid...

    Noch besser eine Kombination aus beiden, wenn jemand wirklich tiefe Zerknirschung signalisieren will:
    Es tut mir sehr leid, ich muss Sie vielmals um Verzeihung bitten...

    Ich weiß, das macht es nicht unbedingt leichter, aber ich würde Formulierungen mit "leid" in allen diesen Fällen für möglich und akzeptabel halten.


    Edit: Ach ja, und neue Rechtschreibung dann wohl jedesmal "Leid" groß... I'm so sorry! ;-)
    #31VerfasserCalifornia81 (642214) 01 Mai 10, 17:05
    Kommentar
    Edit: Ach ja, und neue Rechtschreibung dann wohl jedesmal "Leid" groß... I'm so sorry! ;-)

    Seit 2006 aber doch nicht mehr: Es heißt jetzt wieder "Es tut mir leid." (Unschlüssige neue Rechtschreibung - #§@&%!)
    #32VerfasserStravinsky (637051) 01 Mai 10, 17:25
    Kommentar
    #32 Ach, guck an, das ist mir ganz entgangen, weil ich dieses großgeschriebene "Leid" sowieso blöd fand und ausgelassen hatte.
    Na, da bin ich ja beruhigt. :-)
    #33VerfasserCalifornia81 (642214) 01 Mai 10, 17:29
    Kommentar
    opine # wrote:

    Mensch, ich habe vielleicht Mist gebaut.

    But that's very informal!


    Is "Mist bauen" considered vulgar, or merely very informal?

    LEO offers 4 translations for it - Siehe Wörterbuch: mist bauen - but none of the English translations are considered vulgar. So I'm not sure whether the original phrase "Mist bauen" is vulgar because of the word Mist.
    #34Verfassereric (new york) (63613) 01 Mai 10, 21:21
    Kommentar
    "Mist", auch in der Formulierung "Mist bauen" ist umgangssprachlich und ich finde es etwas derb, aber nicht vulgär.
    #35Verfassermanni3 (305129) 01 Mai 10, 21:28
    Kommentar
    Nö, "Mist" finde ich auch nicht vulgär. Es ist eher die etwas abgeschwächtere Form von "Scheiße". Ich habe gelernt: Wenn du dich wenigstens ein bisschen benehmen willst, dann sage lieber "Mist" bevor du "Scheiße" sagst.

    Noch einmal zu der Entschuldigungssache: Ich finde manni3 hat in #1 etwas sehr wichtiges gesagt. Es hängt viel vom Tonfall und von der Mimik ab. Meistens sind diese viel wichiger als die Worte, die man sagt, wenn man eine aufrichtig gemeinte Entschuldigung ausdrücken will.
    "Tut mir sehr Leid" oder "tut mir wirklich Leid" reicht für mein Empfinden völlig aus, wenn man es ehrlich meint und im richtigen Tonfall rüberbringt.


    #36Verfassernessie_x (618865) 01 Mai 10, 21:49
    Kommentar
    Absolut!
    Tonfall, Mimik - und ich möchte auch noch die Körpersprache hinzufügen - sind absolut das Wichtigste. "(Es) tut mir leid" ist dann universell in fast allen Lebenslagen anwendbar.
    #37VerfasserLille Ellen (394423) 02 Mai 10, 16:36
    Kommentar
    Es hängt viel vom Tonfall und von der Mimik ab.

    Und bei Emails und Foren, von der sorgfältigen Wahl der Emoticons!
    #38Verfassereric (new york) (63613) 02 Mai 10, 18:22
    Kommentar
    #34: LEO offers 4 translations for it - Siehe Wörterbuch: mist bauen - but none of the English translations are considered vulgar.

    I'd say some Brits might consider "cock up" rather vulgar.
    #39VerfasserKinkyAfro (587241) 13 Jun. 12, 19:23
     
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  
 
 
  • Pinyin
     
  • Tastatur
     
  • Sonderzeichen
     
  • Lautschrift
     
 
 
:-) automatisch zu 🙂 umgewandelt