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  • Betreff

    Fleiß

    Kontext/ Beispiele
    Ein englisches Wort für Fleiß ist "industry". Das höre ich jetzt zum ersten mal. Wird das sehr selten benutzt? Ist "diligence" nicht sehr viel besser?
    Kommentar
    Vielen Dank.
    VerfasserMichael31 Jan. 06, 19:50
    Ergebnisse aus dem Wörterbuch
    diligenceder Fleiß  kein Pl.
    assiduityder Fleiß  kein Pl.
    hard workder Fleiß  kein Pl.
    industriousnessder Fleiß  kein Pl.
    on purpose mit Fleiß
    No sweet without sweat.Ohne Fleiß kein Preis.
    No pain, no gain.Ohne Fleiß kein Preis.
    Kommentar
    It depends on the context.
    #1VerfasserHelmi (U.S.)31 Jan. 06, 19:55
    Vorschlag.
    Kontext/ Beispiele
    If I use it in a letter of recommendation. Which word sounds better, diligence or industry?
    #2VerfasserMichael31 Jan. 06, 20:03
    Kommentar
    If you talk about a characteristic of a person I would use "industriousness."
    #3VerfasserHelmi (U.S.)31 Jan. 06, 20:07
    Kommentar
    If you can use an adjective, "hard-working" might do.

    OTOH if this is an "Arbeitszeugnis", the real meaning depends very much on context, and one would need the whole sentence to understand what is really meant.

    Since German "Zeugnisse" use a special code, I don't know how you can really translate them without explaining the code to the recipient. One definitely needs to know the purpose of the translation (cf DIN 2345).

    Many of the sentences with "Fleiß" could be pretty negative, but if the text actually says "Er bemühte sich mit großem Fleiß, die ihm übertragenen Aufgaben zu unserer Zufriedenheit zu erfüllen.", you could hardly put what they really meant, in a certified translation.
    #4VerfasserMike E.31 Jan. 06, 20:31
    Vorschlag.
    Kontext/ Beispiele
    "Er zeigt während seiner Tätigkeit in unserem Hause stets Initiative, großen Eifer und Fleiß und erfüllte seine Aufgaben mit vorbildlichem Engagement."

    Which word sounds more positiv as a translation for Fleiß: diligence or industry

    Or is there no difference?
    Kommentar
    .
    #5VerfasserMichael31 Jan. 06, 20:46
    Kommentar
    How about: During his employment in our company he invariably showed initiative, great zeal and was hard-working....
    #6VerfasserHelmi (U.S.)31 Jan. 06, 20:54
    Vorschlag.
    Kontext/ Beispiele
    Thank you Helmi, but I donŽt need any other suggestion. I just would like to know if there is a big difference between industry and diligence. Or means both almost the same?...if I use it as a translation for that sentence.
    #7VerfasserMichael31 Jan. 06, 21:08
    Kommentar
    There is hardly a difference. Both mean a person marked by steady dependable energetic work; not lazy. I think industriuousness is more widely used.
    #8VerfasserHelmi (U.S.)31 Jan. 06, 21:16
    Kommentar
    Mike: you seem hell-bent on using either diligence or industry and Mike E and Helmi are rightly trying to guide you away from them towards using either an adjective or the noun industriousness. So to anwer a question with a question: why aren't you paying attention to the feedback you are getting?
    #9VerfasserRoger 31 Jan. 06, 21:19
    Kommentar
    Thank you very much...all of you.

    Roger sorry, I should have used the general discussion forum, because actually there was no english missing. I just wanted to know about that diligence or industry issue.

    We can close this now.
    #10VerfasserMichael31 Jan. 06, 21:30
    Kommentar
    @Michael: Roger is right. It is better to use an adjective, or to follow Mike E's and Helmi's suggestions.

    But, if you really want to use *only either "diligence" or "industry" then diligence is probably better, because "industry" could be confused with the other meaning: "Industrie". Basically though, both sound a bit old-fashioned and musty, and "diligence" also makes us think of a diligent pupil or slave.

    "He showed ... great zeal and industry..." (Was his last job in the 19th century? At the time of the industrial revolution, perhaps?)

    "He demonstrated ... great enthusiasm and diligence..." - is a bit better, (although I'm still thinking of that subservient pupil...)

    "He always demonstrated intitiative and great enthusiasm, and was extremely industrious/hard-working" - would sound more like natural English. (Or does that not interest you?)
    #11VerfasserMary (nz/A)31 Jan. 06, 21:58
    Kommentar
    Mary thank you. You made it clear. It is very interesting for me :-)
    #12VerfasserMichael31 Jan. 06, 22:30
     
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