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    English missing

    Gutachter vs. Betreuer (Uni)

    Subject

    Gutachter vs. Betreuer (Uni)

    Sources

    Der Kontext:


    Ein Professor betreut Studenten bei ihrer Abschlussarbeit.

    Wenn er die Arbeit anschließend benotet, ist er zugleich der Gutachter.


    Es gibt aber auch wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiter, die Abschlussarbeiten betreuen. Die Benotung erfolgt aber wieder durch den Prof.

    In diesem Fall ist der wiss. Mitarbeiter der Betreuer der Abschlussarbeiten, der Prof. der Gutachter.


    Wie lauten die englischen Begriffe für Betreuer und Gutachter? "Tutor" für Betreuer passt mir nicht so recht, da wir auch studentische Tutoren für Übungsgruppen haben. "Supervisor" für beides bildet den Unterschied nicht ab.


    Gibt es da unterschiedliche Begriffe, die ich verwenden kann?

    AuthorKopfloser_Nick (1064761) 24 Jul 20, 14:47
    Suggestionmentor
    Sources

    LEO

    Comment

    try this - for lack of better suggestions :-)

    #1Author udo (236605) 30 Jul 20, 12:51
    Comment

    In doctoral theses der ETH Zürich heisst es nur "Examiner" und "Co-examiner". Betreuer werden offenbar nicht aufgeführt, zumindest nicht auf dem Titelblatt. Dann würde vielleicht "Examiner" ggü. "Tutor" oder "Supervisor" passen.

    #2Author virus (343741)  30 Jul 20, 17:27
    Comment

    Systems vary nationally, so the terms won't readily correspond. In the UK tutor is a faculty rank; in the US the word normally refers only to people who offer special individual help. It sounds as if the Betreuer corresponds to what US universities commonly designate either as the supervisor or as the director of a thesis or dissertation. The others might be readers (which is never the title of a rank as it is in the UK) or simply committee members. A mentor is a person who gives support and advice; I don't recall seeing the word used in the US to designate an official function.

    #3Authormabr (598108) 31 Jul 20, 01:51
    Comment

    For Betreuer I think you can fairly uncontroversially say supervisor without implying any particular academic rank or assuming any particular national system.


    For Gutachter you could probably use examiner, again without implying any particular academic rank or assuming any particular national system.


    I think in virus's ETH case, one of the (co-)examiners will invariably have been the doctoral candidate's supervisor.



    #4Author amw (532814) 31 Jul 20, 11:37
    Comment

    #3 "In the UK tutor is a faculty rank; in the US the word normally refers only to people who offer special individual help."


    I'm not sure that what you say about the UK is correct. In my day at least, a tutor was someone who offered individual help, on either academic or more personal day-to-day matters. And "tutor" certainly wasn't a "faculty rank".

    #5Author RTH01 (932829) 31 Jul 20, 18:21
    Comment

    Probably just thoughtless ignorance. Sorry. I was referring imprecisely to the Oxbridge tutorial system. So, for instance, https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate...: "Oxford's core teaching is based around conversations, normally between two or three students and their tutor, who is an expert on that topic. We call these tutorials, and it's your chance to talk in-depth about your subject and to receive individual feedback on your work." Harvard (not a UK institution, I know) has undergraduate tutorials; tutoring is a function, not a rank. Most Americans, though, will think of tutors as extracurricular helpers, not as curricular functionaries.


    I wasn't going to write again, but having been properly called out on my previous post, I'll add that examiner would be a very unusual designation in the US. You'd ask a graduate student who the readers or the committee members were. That's true even for qualifying examinations. US dissertations, in my experience, are not "examined." You might still want to use examiner for Gutachter; it's a perfectly appropriate term within the context of a foreign system.

    #6Authormabr (598108) 03 Aug 20, 00:14
    Comment

    #6: And for the sake of completeness, it's the "Oxford" not the "Oxbridge tutorial system". The relevant teacher in Cambridge is termed a "supervisor".

    #7Author Spike BE (535528) 03 Aug 20, 14:12
    Comment

    Thanks again.

    #8Authormabr (598108) 03 Aug 20, 17:41
     
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