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    to bail out

    Sources

    Sepang was also notable as being the first occasion that saw the simmering rivalry between Lewis and Nico boil over. Nico had appeared to block Lewis in final qualifying, although the latter still started on pole thanks to an earlier qualifying time. It would be the fortieth time Lewis had won pole, and he was fairly relaxed when the inevitable questions about whether Nico had set out to deliberately obstruct his progress came his way.

    Lewis simply smiled and replied: ‘No’. He added: ‘I just bailed out.’

    Nico appeared less keen to draw a line under the incident, saying: ‘How do we make that a fact, that he bailed out before he came across me? That is the interesting one, because me just saying it isn’t going to bear much weight.

    Comment

    Hallo, ich kenne die Bedeutung von "bail out", aber in diesem Kontext habe ich die Bedeutung nicht verstanden. Hat jemand eine Idee?

    Vielen Dank

    Authorglamourartists (842897) 26 Aug 21, 23:50
    Sources

    LEO:
    bail out – (mit dem Fallschirm) abspringen; aussteigen (u.a.)
    Dictionary: bail out

    M-W:
    bail out – (intr. v.) 1: to parachute from an aircraft
    2: to abandon a harmful or difficult situation
    (also:) LEAVE, DEPART
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ba...

    Cambridge:
    bail out – (1) to jump out of an aircraft with a parachute because the aircraft is going to have an accident:
    The plane's engine failed and the pilot was forced to bail out.
    (2) (= STOP) (mainly US) to stop doing or being involved with something:
    The actor has bailed out of the movie after only three weeks' shooting.
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionar...

    Collins:
    bail out – ... bail out (Brit.) 1. (intransitive)
    to make an emergency parachute jump from an aircraft ...
    3. (intransitive) (informal)
    to escape from a predicament
    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/...
    bail out – (Amer.) 1.  to parachute from an aircraft in an emergency
    2.  (Informal) to flee a difficult or dangerous situation
    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/...

    Macmillan:
    bail out – ... 3: to leave a project, situation, or relationship, especially when it becomes difficult
    https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionar...
    Comment

    It might help if you could describe what they were arguing about. Was Nico perhaps accusing Lewis (Hamilton?) of obstructing him or impeding him, and Lewis saying he was already beyond that point, away from Nico?

    In any case, when Lewis says he just bailed out, he probably means he just left, got out fast, hurried away from the problem or difficulty. You couldn't use the LEO entries here, because he didn't literally jump out of the car, but you can probably picture that he gunned the engine, sped away from the scene, out of the bad situation.

    The German speakers will be able to suggest something more colloquial, but if I had to guess, I might try something like 'Davon bin ich einfach schnell weggekommen / weggefahren / weggehuscht.'

    #1Author hm -- us (236141) 27 Aug 21, 02:10
    Comment

    Ich bin schnell aus der Klemme (he)rausgekommen.

    Ich habe mich (schnell / elegant) aus der Affäre gezogen.

    Ich war dann ganz schnell weg.


    (So wie man ganz schnell aus dem Untersuchungsgefängnis verschwinden kann, wenn man die Kaution hinterlegt.)

    #2Author mbshu (874725)  27 Aug 21, 07:16
    Comment

    In dem gegebenen Kontext würde ich sagen: Abbrechen.

    Lewis hat seinen Versuch einer schnellen Runde abgebrochen, bevor ihm Nico in die Quere kam.

    #3Author Icky Bob (1233677) 27 Aug 21, 08:58
    Comment

    Oder "ich habe zurückgezogen" (nicht-reflexiv). Selten, aber gerade im Sport gebräuchlich, und für die Situation passend. Beispielsweise schon mehrfach gehört (im Fußball): "XYZ ging mit gestrecktem Bein in den Zweikampf, zog aber im letzten Moment zurück." (sic! ohne "das Bein")

    #4Author Jesse_Pinkman (991550) 27 Aug 21, 09:28
    Comment

    Hier wohl nicht ganz passend, aber in anderen Kontexten, in denen jemand sich von einer Sache schnell zurückzieht, wäre im Deutschen "den Absprung wagen / schaffen" ... (im übertragenen Sinn, ganz ohne Fallschirm) ...

    #5Author no me bré (700807) 27 Aug 21, 10:49
    Comment

    Es dürfte sich um diesen Vorfall von 2015 handeln: https://www.motorsport-magazin.com/formel1/ne...

    "So betonte Hamilton, dass er seinen Run schon vor dem Zusammentreffen mit Rosberg abgebrochen habe." (S. #3)

    #6Author Raudona (255425)  27 Aug 21, 21:44
     
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