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  • Subject

    hüsteln

    Context/ examples
    Roberts überhebliche Bemerkungen ließen Peter hüsteln.
    Comment
    Hüsteln - so eine Art Mischung aus zurückhaltendem Husten und Räuspern - bibt es da einen englischen Ausdruck für?

    Btw: gibt es im Englischen kein Wort für "räuspern"? In LEO steht nur "to clear one's throat".
    AuthorUho <de>10 Jun 03, 12:38
    Comment
    'To clear one's throat' is for me the way to say 'räuspern'.
    For your main question, I thought of "to say ahem" (Amer. Her.: used to attract attention or to express doubt or warning) or - even better - "to harrumph" (Amer. Her: to make a show of clearing one's throat)
    #1AuthorNancy10 Jun 03, 12:49
    Suggestionto give a slight cough
    Sources
    Pons
    Context/ examples
    Robert's patronising remarks made Peter give a slight cough.
    Comment
    Peter: Sorry, no offence meant ;-)
    #2Authorrob-by10 Jun 03, 13:01
    Suggestionto say ahem [ling.][Amer.]
    Sources
    Roberts überhebliche Bemerkungen ließen Peter hüsteln.

    I came across the word in a Follett novel - "Ein diskretes Huesteln unterbrach sie."
    Comment
    Huesteln - to say ahem is an accurate description. But an American would never use that phrase Nor would we ever say "he gave a slight cough, or "he coughed slightly., to render the meaning "to call attention to oneself by making a mild throat clearing sound" It can't be done with a single verb. Perhaps in the UK.
    #3Authorsnobbig01 Jul 07, 16:13
    Sources
    "to render the meaning "' to call attention to oneself by making a mild throat clearing sound'"
    Comment

    er, I think "hüsteln" doesn't mean "drawing attention" "preparing to say something" here at all. That would apply to be a "hüsteln" instead of (!) a "räuspern" as a more polite and modest guesture of clearing ones throat.

    In the initially cited context however it does mean to give a small cough - but solely to express ones disbelief / scepticism to what the former person said WITHOUT realy replying anything. I.E more like an unspoken comment between an ironic "hear, hear" and a nonverbal "Beg your pardon".

    Would like to know if there would be an expression for that kind of slight coughing behaviour in AE, even if "to give a slight caugh" works for that particular purpose in BE - if it does?!?
    #4AuthorUwe29 Aug 07, 11:08
    Comment
    *schubs*


    Belatedly ...

    Is there some reason why this German verb isn't already in the dictionary? I feel like I've seen it used a lot as an Erikativ, just here in the forum.
    #5Author hm -- us (236141) 17 Mar 18, 10:11
    Comment
    I was moved to look this up again because I realized I had probably left off the umlaut (what else is new, my bête noire), and it's still not in LEO.

    Is it not a real word, or what?
    #6Author hm -- us (236141) 30 Apr 20, 09:28
    Comment

    "hüsteln" halte ich für ein richtiges Wort. Der Erikativ wäre eher *hüstel* ;-)


    Im Englischen denke ich an "hem(ming)". AWWDI ;-)

    #7Author B.L.Z. Bubb (601295)  30 Apr 20, 09:32
    Sources

    hüsteln

    Wortart: schwaches Verb

    Häufigkeit: ▒░░░░

    Rechtschreibung

    Worttrennung: hüs|teln

    Beispiel: ich hüst[e]le

    Bedeutung: [mehrmals hintereinander] schwach husten

    Beispiele

    • ärgerlich, verlegen, vornehm hüsteln
    • diskret hüsteln (durch Hüsteln jemandem ein Zeichen geben, etwas zu tun, zu beachten o. Ä.)

    https://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/huesteln

    Comment


    Doch, doch, "hüsteln" ist ein ordentliches Wort. Und ja, der ordentliche Erikativ ist *hüstel* - vgl. etwa related discussion: Korrekturitos II – Tippfehlerkorrekturfaden - #76 ;-)

    #8Author lingua franca (48253) 30 Apr 20, 09:43
    Comment

    Wenn man hustet, dann hustet man einfach, ohne zu versuchen, es zu unterdrücken.


    Wenn man hüstelt, tut man es entweder mit Absicht - fast so wie räuspern - oder man versucht, den Husten vornehm zu unterdrücken.


    Es ist aber schon ein echtes Wort, wie bereits meine Vorredner sagten.

    #9Author penguin (236245) 30 Apr 20, 09:45
    Comment
    l.f., did you just fix that behind the scenes? Or were you just reading my mind? *staun*

    Okay, so do I need to do the N.E., or would anyone else be so kind? My proposals would be

    to say "ahem"
    to cough slightly / give a slight cough
    to clear one's throat


    Bubb, 'to hem' in the non-sewing sense does exist -- well remembered. But I would say it's dated or historical except in the fixed phrase 'to hem and haw.'
    #10Author hm -- us (236141) 30 Apr 20, 10:20
    Comment

    IIRC, this awful teacher in Hairy Porter (sic!), whose name I have forgotten again, says "hem, hem" in direct speech, though.


    Umbridge. Dolores Umbridge.

    #11Author B.L.Z. Bubb (601295)  30 Apr 20, 10:22
    Comment
    #12Author no me bré (700807) 30 Apr 20, 11:01
    Sources
    Comment

    Ich kenne exzessives hem-hem von den genialen Büchern über das Leben und die Gedankenwelt von Nigel Molesworth.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainm...

    For those wan souls who aren't yet acquainted with Nigel Molesworth, "the curse of st custard's" and "gorila of 3B", there are four books in his mighty oeuvre, each one a coruscating survey of his vile public school, its "various swots, bulies, cissies, milksops greedy guts and oiks with whom i am forced to mingle hem-hem".


    #13AuthorSpinatwachtel (341764) 30 Apr 20, 11:10
    Comment

    re #10: Nein, hm--us, ich habe gar nichts 'drehen' müssen. Der Umlaut war schon an der richtigen Stelle, als ich Deinen Post (sehr bald nach dessen Auftauchen) zum ersten Mal sah (und würde mir nie erlauben, in Deinen Gedanken herumzulesen);-)


    In gewissen Kreisen ist übrigens/bekanntermaßen auch ein Erikativ ohne Umlaut gängig: *hystel*;-)

    #14Author lingua franca (48253)  30 Apr 20, 11:41
     
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