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    Stehsitz(element)

    Quellen
    Gesucht wir das Wort für "Stehsitzelemente", wie sie in Bussen und Straßenbahnen vorkommen: gepolsterte Lehne an Haltestange.
    Kommentar
    Mein Vorschlag wäre "standing seats". Ist das korrektes Englisch?
    VerfasserLeo's Minnie11 Mai 07, 10:07
    VorschlagStanding/leaning seats
    Quellen
    Niemand würde leaning seats sagen, mindestens in Irland, an sie aber man sich anlehnt.
    Kommentar
    Leider gibt es kein reines Wort für das auf Englisch.
    #1VerfasserDer Tierarzt11 Mai 07, 10:40
    Vorschlagsit-stand chair
    Quellen
    Kommentar
    "Standing seat" seems like a contradiction in terms. "Leaning seat" is no better. The suggestion from wikipedia is the best I can come up with:

    "A sit-stand chair [15] allows the person to lean against this device and be partially supported. It is better than standing all day."

    #2VerfasserERD (328036) 11 Mai 07, 10:50
    Vorschlagsit-stand chair
    Kommentar
    That's my problem "standing seat" doesn't sound really correct, but I think "sit-stand chair" should be o.k.

    Thank's for your help.
    #3VerfasserLeo's Minnie11 Mai 07, 11:05
    Kommentar
    Maybe best to explain it in some way, as the vast majority of people will have no idea what a "sit-stand" chair is. Most will have seen them though.
    #4VerfasserERD (328036) 11 Mai 07, 11:13
    Kommentar
    Take it from a Hiberno-English native speaker, no one would have a clue what you were on about were you to use "sit-stand" chair, hence kein reines Wort dafür.
    #5VerfasserDer Tierarzt11 Mai 07, 11:28
    Kommentar
    And what about "pad to lean against"???
    #6VerfasserLeo's Minnie11 Mai 07, 11:37
    Kommentar
    There's just no simple way to put it Minne, sit-stand chair, pad to lean against, none of these words are in common circulation. Your best bet is to either use a sub-clause to explain it (e.g.: one of those chairs you see on the tram/metro/bus etc. that you can lean against), or simply say a chair, unfortunately there's really no inbetween.
    #7VerfasserDer Tierarzt (329107) 11 Mai 07, 11:46
    Kommentar
    The problem I have is that I need this for a power point presentation (therefore it should be quite short) in which I have to say that these "Stehsitz(elemente)" are situated in the area of swivel joints (=Drehgestelle). Therefore the place is useable for buggies, wheelchairs etc.
    #8VerfasserLeo's Minnie11 Mai 07, 11:55
    Kommentar
    Well then if I were you I'd make up something fancy, like variable posture seating, or vertical seat, that way no-one will be bold enough to ask what it actually is, lest they come across as sounding stupid.
    #9VerfasserDer Tierarzt (329107) 11 Mai 07, 11:57
    Kommentar
    That's it. I think I'll do this.
    Thank you very much.
    #10VerfasserLeo's Minnie11 Mai 07, 12:25
    Kommentar
    wie sie in Bussen und Straßenbahnen vorkommen: gepolsterte Lehne an Haltestange.  

    this is an old thread, but nevertheless; I've been travelling in busses and trams in Germany for decades now, but I have no idea what the above is describing; help please. :-)
    #11Verfassermikefm (760309) 07 Feb. 15, 21:55
    Kommentar
    #12Verfasserno me bré (700807) 07 Feb. 15, 22:13
    Kommentar
    Oh - they are relatively new; since busses and trams have had extra spaces for wheelchairs; I've always thought they had something to do with that. :-)

    And seat/sitting is way off IMO; at the most one can lean against them.
    #13Verfassermikefm (760309) 07 Feb. 15, 22:16
    Quellen
    "The other reason I've heard for why people won't move in is that the full floor-to-ceiling poles are located near the doors. Short people have trouble reaching the rails mounted at ceiling level, and I think most people feel that holding onto the seatback bars doesn't help you balance. I'd like to see Metro use the metal straps that New York used to use (which have the added advantage of moving as you shift your weight as the train moves). I'd also like to see them introduce the padded leaning bars that are used on the London Underground--basically, in places where there is no seat along the car's wall, the Tube has a little padded butt-rest that is roughly at the height of the average person's butt. You lean against it, sort of like half-sitting but in a standing position, to help keep your balance when standing. It helps if you're carrying baggage en route to Paddington or Heathrow, for example. Given how Metro cars here in DC tend to slam to a stop or jerk into the station, Metro needs to be able to reassure skittish people that they will be able to maintain their balance even if they move away from the doors."
    http://voices.washingtonpost.com/getthere/200...
    Kommentar
    You'll have to come to Berlin mikefm. They've been in the trams and subways here for a long time now. :-)

    The thread is 8 years old, but "seat" sounds strange to me, too. Maybe some combination of padded / leaning bars.

    Edit: see example above. Of course, the more colloquial "butt-rest" would also work. ;-)
    #14Verfasserwupper (354075) 07 Feb. 15, 22:22
     
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