Advertising
LEO

It looks like you’re using an ad blocker.

Would you like to support LEO?

Disable your ad blocker for LEO or make a donation.

 
  •  
  • Subject

    off fore leg

    Sources
    A post race veterinary examination of ERBULOBO (Trainer Chris Crook) revealed the gelding to be lame in the off fore leg.
    Comment
    welches Vorderbein ist das, das linke oder das rechte?
    Authorducky02 Nov 07, 12:54
    Suggestion*schieb*
    #1Authord02 Nov 07, 13:19
    Suggestionrechts
    Sources
    http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/dictio...

    22. adjective on the right of: situated on the right side of a vehicle, farthest away from the curb
    Comment
    Wußte gar nicht, daß die Amis auch Linksverkehr haben ;-)

    Keine Ahnung, ob das richtig ist.
    #2AuthorBacon [de] (264333) 02 Nov 07, 13:28
    Comment
    According to Webster it means "right", which, curiously, implies driving or riding on the left.
    #3Authorescoville (237761) 02 Nov 07, 13:35
    Suggestion*schieb* any horse people out there?
    Comment
    thank you very much bacon, but I would feel much more comfortable if that definition was corroborated by someone in the know about horsetalk.
    #4Authorducky02 Nov 07, 13:38
    Comment
    http://www.bartleby.com/61/68/O0036800.html

    9a. Being on the right side of an animal or vehicle.

    Horses ARE animals, if I'm not mistaken ;-)
    #5AuthorBacon [de] (264333) 02 Nov 07, 13:40
    Suggestionthanks
    Comment
    ok, I´m convinced, bacon [de].

    Thanks to everybody, and have a nice weekend.

    I´m off now ;-))
    #6Authorducky02 Nov 07, 13:50
    Suggestionnear = left, off = right
    Comment
    Where's Helmi? I would think he could verify this, just for the record.

    I don't know where that line about 'farthest from the curb' came from; maybe Encarta copied that from a BE source. But I always assumed that 'off' in this sense meant the side farther away from the point of view of the speaker, i.e., the driver or rider. And I believe riders do always mount from the left side of the horse, whether in the UK or North America, so the left is the near side and the right is the off side.

    I have the feeling it's used much more for horses than vehicles in any case, at least in the books I've read. Or perhaps it was used more in the days of horse-drawn vehicles. That is, 'off wheel' sounds right to me; 'off tire,' not so much.
    #7Authorhm -- us (236141) 02 Nov 07, 16:56
    Comment
    "That is, 'off wheel' sounds right to me; 'off tire,' not so much." - but both would be equally lethal on a busy highway ;-)
    #8AuthorBacon [de] (264333) 02 Nov 07, 16:57
    Suggestionnear = left, off = right
    Comment
    I've been taking riding lessons for a few weeks now, and can confirm hm--us' above statement: near = left, off = right.

    "near hand", "off hand" are commonplace/standard when talking horses.
    #9Authorsamsonite02 Nov 07, 16:59
     
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  
 
 
  • Pinyin
     
  • Keyboard
     
  • Special characters
     
  • Lautschrift
     
 
 
:-) automatisch zu 🙂 umgewandelt