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  • Subject

    Mortality

    Sources
    from a scientific publication:

    "Manures consist of excreta, hair or feathers, spilled water (...) and mortality."

    Comment
    What does "mortality" mean hear? It sounds like an odd usage to me. How would you translate it to German?

    Of course I can guess from the context, but I would prefer to know it exactly.


    Thanks a lot!
    Authorginger_4 (516441) 03 Dec 09, 12:08
    Comment
    be nice to have the whole sentence, ideally with context
    #1AuthorEnzymC03 Dec 09, 12:12
    Comment
    wild guess: sterbliche Überreste, Kadaver?
    #2Author Miss Take (399408) 03 Dec 09, 12:14
    SuggestionThanks for your comments
    Comment
    Context: it's a publication on poultry and livestock waste treatment.

    It starts with an explication of the waste type: manure
    The whole sentence is a list of "ingredients", all of them obvious to me, despite the last.
    "Poultry and livestock manures consist of excreta, hair or feathers, spilled water and feed, process-generated wastewater, bedding and mortality.

    I can't agree with "Kadaver" as I'm quite sure, that dead animals have to be disposed separately.
    #3Authorginger_4 (516441) 03 Dec 09, 13:33
    Suggestionwohl tatsächlich Kadaver
    Sources
    Composting mortality is generally done in constructed bins, and is placed in layers rather than windrows. Typical compost would be a layer of high carbon material like straw or wood chips, a layer of dead animals, and a layer of manure. It is important to cover completely the dead animals. The composting process breaks down even large animals, however some large bones may remain. Temperatures vary with carbon sources such as peanut hulls and should be kept below 150 degrees. Instances of combustion have been reported when bins exceed 180 degrees.
    http://www.pork.org/porkscience/Environment/M...
    #4Authorenigma03 Dec 09, 13:43
    Comment
    Hmmm.

    In your article it's in fact used as "Kadaver".

    But mine is not about composts, but about anaerobic digestion, and for that you need a rather liquid substrate and whole cadavers would hinder the process flow.

    But maybe I just don't like the thought, because it sounds disgusting...

    Well at least I know, that my manure doesn't contain any "mortality".
    #5Authorginger_4 (516441) 03 Dec 09, 14:06
    Suggestionmanure & mortality
    Sources
    Composting Manure/Mortality

    Composting relies on aerobic bacteria to decompose manure and mortality into a stable product that can be used as compost. Composting manure is generally done in windrows or bins. Manure or mortality are mixed with a high carbon source, such as wood chips, and turned occasionally for aeration. The temperature should be monitored and aerated when the temperature begins to drop below 120 degrees. The carbon-nitrogen ratio is important as is the moisture content and aeration. Critical factors in composting include temperature, carbon-nitrogen ratios, and moisture control.

    Composting mortality is generally done in constructed bins, and is placed in layers rather than windrows. Typical compost would be a layer of high carbon material like straw or wood chips, a layer of dead animals, and a layer of manure. It is important to cover completely the dead animals. The composting process breaks down even large animals, however some large bones may remain. Temperatures vary with carbon sources such as peanut hulls and should be kept below 150 degrees. Instances of combustion have been reported when bins exceed 180 degrees
    Comment
    #6AuthorNuki03 Dec 09, 14:13
     
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