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    Translation correct?

    Betet für Japan! Für die, die verletzt sind! Für die, die kein Zuhause mehr haben! Für die, die Ange…

    Source Language Term

    Betet für Japan! Für die, die verletzt sind! Für die, die kein Zuhause mehr haben! Für die, die Angehörige verloren haben!

    Correct?

    Pray for japan! For them who got hurt! for them who lost her home! for them who lost immediate family!

    Comment
    Ich glaub, dass ist nicht ganz richtig... Würde mich freuen, wenn mir jemand dabei helfen könnte!
    vielen dank
    lg
    Authornatalie_0115 Mar 11, 11:46
    Suggestions

    Betet für Japan!

    -

    Pray for japan!



    Comment
    Pray for Japan! For those who got hurt! For those who lost their home! For those who lost family members!
    #1Authorauwers (761139) 15 Mar 11, 11:54
    Comment
    vielen Dank! :)
    #2Authornatalie_0115 Mar 11, 12:00
    Comment
    ... ich fände '... for the Japanese' idiomatischer . . .
    #3AuthorDaddy . . . (533448) 15 Mar 11, 12:06
    Comment
    for those who've lost their homes.

    In English, each gets his/her own. :-)

    And I'd say "who've" or who have" since the homes are still lost. Also: who've gotten hurt. ... who've lost family members.
    #4Authordude (253248) 15 Mar 11, 13:30
    Comment
    Tja, hätte man mal vor Erdbeben und Tsunami gebetet!
    #5AuthorMiMo (236780) 15 Mar 11, 14:46
    Suggestions

    For all those who were injured

    -

    ...



    Comment
    Please beware 'gotten', this is very AE and never used in BE. The above suggestion avoids the problem.
    #6Authorpowidluk15 Mar 11, 15:27
    Suggestions

    Pray for Japan etc ...

    -

    ...



    Comment
    Just a suggestion:

    Pray for Japan, pray for all those who were injured, for those who lost their homes and for those who lost their nearest and dearest.
    #7Authorpowidluk15 Mar 11, 15:45
    Comment
    Remember that German commands use exclamation points because they're in the imperative, but in English, exclamation points only express strong emotion. In the original post, the punctuation looks angry, like military orders from a drill sergeant.

    In a worship service, we normally invite people to pray rather than ordering them to do so.

    Let us pray for Japan: for the injured, for (all) those who (have) lost their homes, and for (all) those who (have) lost loved ones.
    #8Authorhm -- us (236141) 15 Mar 11, 15:53
    Comment
    well, we don't really know the context here, do we?
    #9Authordude (253248) 15 Mar 11, 15:58
    Comment
    Da wollen wir mal beten,
    dass Gebete für Japan irgendwas bewirken können.


    :-/
    #10Authorlieber unplugged15 Mar 11, 16:07
    Comment
    No, we don't know that it's a worship service, but I can't think of any context in which it would be appropriate to command people to pray.
    #11Authorhm -- us (236141) 15 Mar 11, 16:23
    Comment
    It doesn't necessarily have to be a command; it could be a request.
    #12Authordude (253248) 15 Mar 11, 16:25
    Comment
    ... I see it as an urgent appeal = der Aufruf . . .
    #13AuthorDaddy . . . (533448) 15 Mar 11, 18:17
    Comment
    Yes, whatever; my point is just that if you use exclamation points in English, it will come across as a harsh command.
    #14Authorhm -- us (236141) 15 Mar 11, 18:55
    Comment
    Deshalb heißt es in der katholischen Liturgie auch immer "Lasset uns beten" (Oremus).
    #15AuthorMiMo (236780) 15 Mar 11, 19:38
    Comment
    I wholly agree with hm about the exclamation points. With them, it sounds like some wild-haired street corner fire-and-brimstone type yelling "Repent!"

    No. 8 sounds most appropriate to me, of the options given thus far.
    #16AuthorKatydid (US) (694445) 15 Mar 11, 19:42
    Comment
    ... zum Begriff 'exclamation point' sagt LEO:

    exclamation mark (Brit.) [ling.] = das Ausrufezeichen [Grammatik]
    exclamation point (Amer.) = das Ausrufezeichen
    note of exclamation = das Ausrufezeichen
    . . .
    #17AuthorDaddy . . . (533448) 15 Mar 11, 19:45
    Comment
    it sounds like some wild-haired street corner fire-and-brimstone type yelling

    And how do we know that's not the case here? :-)
    #18Authordude (253248) 15 Mar 11, 19:46
    Comment
    You're right, of course: Could be, sandwich board and all.

    It just seems more likely to me, from the quality of the original attempt, that the OP genuinely doesn't know when to use or drop exclamation points from D into E.
    #19AuthorKatydid (US) (694445) 15 Mar 11, 19:49
    Comment
    "lost their homes" würde bedeuten, dass jeder mehr als ein Zuhause hätte. Ich glaube "lost their home" ist richtig.
    #20AuthorTr6fan16 Mar 11, 10:57
    Comment
    No, in English that would mean they had all lived in one home.

    If I recall correctly, that's a difference in singular/plural agreement between the two languages. There are threads in the forum archive on topics such as 'they raised their hands / opened their books / scratched their heads.'
    #21Authorhm -- us (236141) 16 Mar 11, 15:32
    Comment
    The exclamation marks would make you sound extremely excited or mad in BE, too. And in BE I'd plead strongly for the "have" in "have lost their...".
    #22AuthorCM2DD (236324) 16 Mar 11, 15:44
    Suggestions

    homes, etc

    -

    ....



    Comment
    Agree with #21, definitely plural in English
    #23Authorpowidluk16 Mar 11, 15:52
    Comment
    that was pointed out in #4 already

    (just saying)
    #24Authordude (253248) 16 Mar 11, 15:58
    Comment
    @ 25: Your contribution is totally unrelated to the OP and should be removed, I dare say.
    On the lookout for cheap clicks, eh?
    #26Authorteflsimone (655257) 16 Mar 11, 23:03
     
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