•  
  • Falscher Eintrag

    Watch your step - Vorsicht Stufe!

    Korrektur

    Watch your step

    -

    Pass auf, wo du hin trittst.


    Kommentar
    Bin mir nicht ganz sicher - klingt das nicht so besser?
    Verfasserina25 Apr. 07, 14:04
    Kontext/ Beispiele
    mind / watch your step
    1 to walk carefully
    2 to behave in a careful and sensible way: You’d better watch your step with him if you don’t want trouble. (OALD)
    Kommentar
    The current entry is indeed wrong. The suggested correction is good for meaning 1 above.
    #1VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 25 Apr. 07, 14:17
    Vorschläge

    Watch your step!

    -

    Gib acht! Sieh Dich vor!



    Kontext/ Beispiele
    PONS COLLINS
    Kommentar
    Also der bestehende Eintrag ist in jedem Fall falsch.

    Die Bedeutung kann [fig] sein, muß aber nicht. Jedenfalls hat es nichts mit Stufen zu tun.
    #2VerfasserCJ unplugged25 Apr. 07, 15:02
    Kommentar
    Aber die Übersetzungsrichtung deutsch nach englisch stimmt, zumindest hinsichtlich üblicher Verwendung. Und als Warnhinweis für Stufen im Untergrund sind die Ausdrücke doch so gut wie synonym, oder nicht?

    http://www.baddesigns.com/step.html
    http://www.labelident.com/catalog/danger-drop... (unten links)
    http://www.sxc.hu/pic/m/h/ha/harry_lund/31845...
    http://www.takegreatpictures.com/content/imag...
    #3Verfasserholger (236115) 25 Apr. 07, 15:12
    Kontext/ Beispiele
    watch one's step 1 to walk with careful steps in order to avoid danger, etc. 2 to proceed with caution, taking care not to anger, offend, etc others.
    (Chambers)

    http://www.safetysignsupplies.co.uk/images/th...
    http://www.safetecvision.co.uk/usrimages_smal...
    Kommentar
    From German to English the closest translation is "Mind the step" which is in Leo.

    Here, "step" refers to the steps you take when walking. Of course, you have to watch your step when you come to a step, too, but when you shout "Watch your step!" you might be warning about a hole, something you are about to step into or slip on, or anything.
    #4VerfasserCM2DD (236324) 25 Apr. 07, 15:26
    Vorschläge

    Watch the step

    Amer. -

    Vorsicht: Stufe



    Watch your step

    -

    Pass auf, wo du hintrittst / Gib acht / usw.



    Mind the step

    Brit. -

    Vorsicht: Stufe



    Kommentar
    I agree that the entry is wrong.

    The point is the difference between 'your step' (= Tritt, Treten; an action, something you do) and 'the step' (= Stufe; an object, something you see).

    To watch your step literally is to watch where you are putting your feet, how you are walking; to step carefully. It's usually said because of rough or uneven ground, a hole you could fall into, or something you could trip over. Of course, you can also say it when the obstacle, the reason for the comment, happens to be a physical step, but it doesn't mean that step, it means the steps you take with your feet.

    To watch your step figuratively is to proceed with caution, tread gingerly, be prudent, behave carefully, etc.: Watch your step with the new boss, he's a maniac about details / has a very short temper / etc.

    Both the literal and the figurative senses with 'your step' are AE/BE and can be translated in many ways; namely, almost any synonym for 'Pass auf' (or the equivalent with Sie).

    Warnings with 'the step,' about a step in the sense of Stufe, however, may be different in AE and BE. 'Mind' in the sense of 'watch out for' or 'be careful of' is BE only; that's why so many American tourists in London are amused enough by 'Mind the gap' to buy the T-shirt, and 'Mind the step' falls in the same very BE category. For us, 'mind' means 'take care of,' 'look after,' as in 'mind the store' or 'mind the baby.'

    There are several possible ways to express 'Vorsicht: Stufe' in AE: Watch the step, Watch out for the step, Be careful of the step, Look out for the step, etc. The most common on a sign might just be 'STEP' or 'Caution: Step'; the others are more what you would say to a person walking. I don't know which of those are AE only and which could also be used in BE.

    #5Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 25 Apr. 07, 15:59
    Vorschläge

    Watch out for the step / Caution: step / etc.

    -

    Vorsicht: Stufe



    Kommentar
    Sorry, I had typed that one too the first time, but I must have inadvertently clicked on one of the lower, script-generated 'neu' links instead of the uppermost, original 'neu' link. The lower 'neu' links create a new set of fields that appear real, but when you hit Send, anything you had typed in them vanishes. Still a frustrating script buglet.
    #6Verfasserhm -- us (236141) 25 Apr. 07, 16:05
    Kommentar
    @hm -- us: I don't remember which browser you are using, but the problem you describe sounds like a browser-related "buglet" (I suspect your browser misinterprets our JavaScript code). I had read your complaint in a different thread and tried to reproduce the behaviour you describe but everything works fine with FF. Does anyone else have the same problem?
    #7VerfasserDoris (LEO-Team) (33) 02 Mai 07, 10:00
    Kommentar
    Hello,

    maybe it's not really reasonable to re-activate such an old thread, but after reading the discussion here I was reminded of these signs "watch your fingers", that you can often find in Japan on automatic sliding doors.

    Any comments from native speakers on this version? Unusual but OK, or simply funny?
    #8VerfasserKai12 Apr. 10, 09:12
    Kommentar
    It's more the fact that a sign like that would probably be seen as unnecessary in England than it is that the English sounds really wrong. It's perfect English, esp. compared to some of the other English signs you get in Japan!
    #9VerfasserJapan fan12 Apr. 10, 09:33
    Kommentar
    Yeah, I know what you mean, I found some very funny signs here - I just wasn't sure about this one. So, thanks a lot for your answer!
    #10VerfasserKai13 Apr. 10, 02:53
    Kommentar
    Hello again,

    while this matter is really unimportant, I couldn't help but think some more about it.

    In the case of "watch your step", it refers to an action, i.e., the step one takes (as "hm -- us" pointed out), not an object/a body part.

    Thus "watch your fingers" would really correspond to "watch your feet". So, if the first one is unusual but OK, shouldn't the second one be acceptable, too? Is it?
    (<- a real question, not a rhetorical one)
    #11VerfasserKai19 Apr. 10, 09:25
    Kommentar
    To me, "watch your feet" would only make sense if the feet were in a static position. You might say it if someone were standing in place and you were afraid you'd drop something on that person's feet, for instance. Or if you were getting on a bus in a wheelchair and afraid to run over the toes of the people already sitting down facing the aisle.

    In the situation in which you might say "watch your fingers," the fingers would be in a static position (here, grasping the door(s)). But as Japan fan has already pointed out, it's not a great idea to base your expectations for idiomatic English on something the Japanese come up with, grammatically correct though it may be. It's hard to imagine too many situations in which there would be an urgent need for someone to watch a body part, but enough time to specify which one. The catchall "watch/look out" would be far and away more common, IMO.
    #12VerfasserKatydid (US)19 Apr. 10, 19:30
    Kommentar
    Kai, one more thing, or a partial retraction of my post above. At the gym today, I did indeed say "watch your foot" to a guy who was swinging it around wildly behind him without looking, for balance when he was bending over. You can definitely say it that way, too (a situation involving movement).
    #13VerfasserKatydid (US)20 Apr. 10, 03:23
    Kommentar
    Hello Katydid,

    thanks for your input. It makes sense to me, especially together with your second post. After reading the first one, I had to think about it a bit, since said doors are automatic, so there is no manual handling involved. The sign rather warns you to keep your fingers out of the doors' way.

    Anyway, don't worry, I'm not trying to learn English by reading signs in Japan ;-). I just walk around, trying hard to decipher the Japanese ones, and sometimes being amused by their English counterpart. This was one example where I wasn't sure whether the English is semantically OK (regardless of real-life applicability) or rather amusing, thus my question here. So, thanks again for your explanations.
    #14VerfasserKai21 Apr. 10, 07:02
     
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  
 
 
  • Pinyin
     
  • Tastatur
     
  • Sonderzeichen
     
  • Lautschrift
     
 
 
:-) automatisch zu 🙂 umgewandelt