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Source Language Term

Vorspann (in einer Zeitschrift)

3 replies   
Correct?

Deck

Examples/ definitions with source references
Often seen in newsletters and magazines, the deck is one or more lines of text found between the headline and the body of the article. The deck elaborates or expands on the headline and topic of the accompanying text. Decks are set in a typeface that is sized somewhere between the headline and body text to provide contrast.

Comment
Vorspann as used in magazines to refer to the two or three lines under the headline that serve as a teaser for the entire article. The English word "deck" is what I have found in DTP glossaries. It seems to be exactly the right word, if uncommon. Any other ideas?

Authorbluehat20 Aug 04, 15:53
Corrections

teaser

-

vorspann



Comment
aus dem journalisitschen bereich kenne ich den beschriebenen abschnitt unter dem namen "teaser", weil der folgende artikel "angeteast" wird. ich hielt das bislang immer für englisch ;-)
#1AuthorAndrea20 Aug 04, 19:46
Corrections

Vorspann

-

deck / deck head / minor head/ subhead



Sources
http://66.102.9.104/search?q=cache:G-iIvB5kBK..."desktop+publishing+"+"glossary"+teaser&hl=en
Context/ examples
Of the experts surveyed, we, Evans, Williams and Bivins agree that a smaller, usually longer, headline that follows the main headline is called a deck or a deck head. We prefer deck head because of the newspaper habit of calling a two-line headline a two-decker, three lines a three-decker and so on. Fanson refers to it as a subtitle (but uses deck and, oddly, tag line, elsewhere). Beach avoids naming it directly, although we choose to infer from other information in one of his books that he would call it a minor head. Because most desktop layout programs call it a subhead (just larger than the normal subheads that are used within stories to divide sections and add visual interest), that term is starting to take hold as well.
Comment
Andrea, I considered "teaser" but I found that teaser was used for many other things designed to awaken interest in the reader--the first word of a headline (otherwise known as a kicker), the brief info about articles in an upcoming issue, movie teasers and teasers on the Internet.

Here is some more info on what Vorspann is in English. For my purposes, subhead doesn't normally work because I use subhead to describe other parts of the page (in translations for corporate design guidelines and advertising layout). Though odd, I might have to use deck (deck head).

#2Authorbluehat20 Aug 04, 21:50
Corrections

lead

-

Vorspann



Sources
Context/ examples
The first sentence or two of a story is often called "the lead". The lead sums up the story. It tells you what is covered in the story, giving you the basic information and letting you know what you can expect to find if you read further. The goal is to be short, but not too short. Leads in a traditional news story are informational. Feature stories use more teasing leads. Learning to write leads is an important part of learning to write for newspapers.
Comment
Probably too late for your translation, but as I've had the same problem...
My impression is that "deck" refers to something structured like a heading, while "Vorspann" refers to a section with 1 or more complete sentences.
#3AuthorCaminante <de>22 Oct 04, 16:59
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