• Special characters
     
  • Lautschrift
     
 
leo-ende
Advertisement
Wrong entry

hoity-toity - Angeblich, Ei sieh da! Was gar nicht stimmt.

9 replies   
Correction

hoity-toity

-

eingebildet, hochnäsig


Comment
hoity-toity heißt eher hochnäsig und eingebildet.
Authorchikky08 Apr 08, 21:38
Context/ examples
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/hoity-toity
hoi·ty-toi·ty (hoit-toit)
adj.
1. Pretentiously self-important; pompous.
2. Given to frivolity or silliness.
[From reduplication of dialectal hoit, to romp; perhaps akin to hoyden.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2003. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/hoity-toit...
Hoity-toity
Meaning Pretentiously self-important, haughty or pompous.
Origin
hoity-toity
Many dictionaries also give a second meaning, that is, given to frivolity, silliness or riotousness. That was the original meaning of this term, but has now almost completely died out. Our view of what is hoity-toity now is defined by the 'looking down the nose' manner adopted by characters like Lady Bracknell, as performed by Dame Edith Evans, in the stage and film versions of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest.
---------------------------
http://dictionary.oed.com/cgi/entry/50107064?
hoity-toity
1. Riotous or giddy behaviour; romping, frolic; disturbance, ‘rumpus’; flightiness. Also, b. Assumption of superiority, ‘airs’, huffiness.

2. A giddy or romping girl; a hoyden, romp. dial. Cf. HIGHTY-TIGHTY n.

B. adj. Frolicsome, romping, giddy, flighty. Also, b. Assuming, haughty, petulant, huffy.

{dag}C. adv. In a frolicsome or giddy manner. Obs.

D. int. An exclamation expressing surprise with some degree of contempt, esp. at words or actions considered to show flightiness or undue assumption.
1695 CONGREVE Love for L. III. x, Hoity toity, what have I to do with his Dreams or his Divination? 1749 FIELDING Tom Jones VII. viii, Hoity toity!..madam is in her airs, I protest. 1838 DICKENS Nich. Nick. xxix, ‘Why he don't mean to say he's going! Hoity toity! Nonsense.’ 1883 MRS. ALEXANDER Executor II. 91 ‘Hoity toity!’ cried Mr. Harding, a little surprised. ‘Well, you'll think better of it’.

Hence hoity-{sm}toityism, hoity-{sm}toityness, flightiness, huffiness, petulance. hoity-toity v. intr.,

(Exemples mostly cut)


Similar information also in:
Cassell's Dictionary of Slang By Jonathon Green
http://books.google.ca/books?id=5GpLcC4a5fAC...
---------------
LEO:
Highty-tighty! also: Hoity-toity! [coll.] --- Ei! Ei! Sieh da! [ugs.] - altmodisch

Zusammengesetzte Einträge
hoity-toity also: highty-tighty --- etepetete [ugs.]
Comment
Ich sehe keinen dringenden Verbesserungsbedarf. Ich haette zwar auch eher an "arrogant, hochnaesig" gedacht, aber OED und zumindest eine andere Quelle listen es auch als erstaunten Ausruf à la "Ei! Ei!" auf. (Wieder etwas gelernt)

Die "hochnaesig"-Uebersetzung ist bereits in LEO. Man koennte "eingebildet, hochnäsig" nachtragen, aber ich finde, dass etepetete eigentlich genauso altmodisch/ungebraeuchlich ist wie hoity-toity und damit eigentlich die bessere Sprachebene.
#1AuthorMausling (384473) 09 Apr 08, 01:07
Suggestions

hoity-toity

-

hochnäsig/eingebildet/arrogant/"zicki-micki"/pikiert



Context/ examples
The New Collins Concise Dict. (N.Z. edition) 1982

hoity-toity (adj.) Inf. arrogant or haughty. [C17: rhyming compound based on C16 hoit to romp, <?]<br/>
Websters New World Dictionary 1988

hoity-toity -adj. [redupl. of obs. hoit, to indulge in noisy mirth]
1. [Brit.] giddy or flighty, capricious 2. haughty,; arrogant; condescending 3 petulant; touchy; huffy

The Cassell Concise Dictionary 1997

hoity-toity -Int. used to express astonishment mixed with disapproval and contempt. - adj. 1. haughty and petulant 2. snobbish 3. (obs.) flighty, frolicsome - n. (obs.) a romp, a frolic, a rumpus [prob. from obs. hoit, to romp]

Duden-Oxford Englsich Großwörterbuch 1990
etepetete (adj.) ugs. fussy; finicky, pernickety (coll.)

hoity-toity adj. coll. hochnäsig (abwertend); eingebildet; (petulant) pikiert
Comment
I agree with chikky. The use as an interjection (leading to its entry as "Ei, siehe da!") is not one I have ever come across, though it is stll mentioned in Cassells 1997 edition.

Etepetete does not have the same meaning either, unless you want to go for "touchy" in Websters' definition (3) above. Etepetete however usually means "fussy" (heikel) in my understanding and in that of the Oxford Duden.

Mausling's second quote mentions:
<< Many dictionaries also give a second meaning, that is, given to frivolity, silliness or riotousness. That was the original meaning of this term, but has now almost completely died out. Our view of what is hoity-toity now is defined by the 'looking down the nose' manner adopted by characters like Lady Bracknell, as performed by Dame Edith Evans, in the stage and film versions of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest.>>

To this we could add that the use as an interjection has also (largely) died out - though there could well be parts of the English-speaking world where it is still used that way.

Note that the variant "highty-tighty" (I hadn't heard of it) is a variation on "hoity-toity", and not the other way around. (As the latter derives from the old verb "hoit")

My suggestion of "Zicki-Micki" (I made it up, of course) has been added for your enjoyment, but I think it gets the picture across quite nicely (even if it is not a standard expression). Jemand ist hoity-toity wenn er (aber eher sie) versnobt ist und gleichzeitig herumzickt.

e.g. Jane was very hoity-toity when the waiter brought her an avocado salad instead of a cream of roast squirrel tail soup. - "I say, can't you read the order when you write it down, my good man?" she retorted hoity-toitily, "or do you employ illiterate rats in your kitchen?" She turned to her husband: "We certainly won't come here again, will we James?!"

In this example Jane is arrogant, condescending, and petulant, thus, hoity-toity.
#2AuthorMary nz/a (431018) 09 Apr 08, 13:18
Comment
That was the extract from Mausling's second quote that somehow disappeared:

"Many dictionaries also give a second meaning, that is, given to frivolity, silliness or riotousness. That was the original meaning of this term, but has now almost completely died out. Our view of what is hoity-toity now is defined by the 'looking down the nose' manner adopted by characters like Lady Bracknell, as performed by Dame Edith Evans, in the stage and film versions of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest."
#3AuthorMary nz/a (431018) 09 Apr 08, 13:20
Context/ examples
Comment
@mary nz/a: You wrote "Etepetete does not have the same meaning either, unless you want to go for "touchy" in Websters' definition (3) above. Etepetete however usually means "fussy" (heikel) in my understanding and in that of the Oxford Duden." Although Oxford Duden gives "heikel" for "fussy", which is alright when talking about a "fussy question", IMO "heikel" rarely is used to decribe a person. If so, it means "empfindlich" (z.B. heikel mit dem Essen sein) and has no derisory connotation as "etepetete", which DWDS defines as "übertrieben eigen, übertrieben fein", my personal association is actually "sniffish". So why not hoity-toity? Also, the mocking sound of the words matches quite well.
By the way, www.dict.cc give a good example for the use of hoity-toity: "Oh, hoity-toity, are we?" = "Wohl zu fein für unsereins?"
#4AuthorAlucinante09 Apr 08, 14:08
Comment
"übertrieben eigen" or "übertrieben fein" are not the same thing as "hoity-toity". Look at the numerous definitions above which I have already taken great pains to provide (copying out of three real dictionaries). These meaninings (for etepetete) equate to "fussy" or "pernickety". Hoity-toity means snobbish and arrogant, condescending etc. Please read the definitions.
#5AuthorMary nz/a (431018) 09 Apr 08, 14:21
Comment
You are also wrong about "a fussy question" which is not English. Fussy is used to describe a person. Heikel in my experience (a mere 21 years in Austria) can also be used to describe a person (also "heiklig", which I believe is dialect, though.) z.B. Er is sehr heikel mit Essen.
#6AuthorMary nz/a (431018) 09 Apr 08, 14:24
Comment
Mary, ausgehend von meinem persoenlichen Sprachgefuehl definierst du "etepetete" meiner Ansicht nach zu eng. Die Umschreibung mit "uebertrieben fein", "uebertrieben eigen" ist zwar voellig korrekt, "etepetete" impliziert aber auch eine gewisse "ich bin besser/feiner als du"-Haltung, insbesondere von Leuten, auf die dies eigentlich nicht zutrifft. Ich wuerde "etepetete" bei einer Gastgeberin der Mittelschicht mit Allueren verwenden, weniger bei Frau Graefin Hohenstein (auch wenn es dort nicht voellig falsch waere).

Daher passt die Beschreibung pretentiously self-important; pompous fuer h.-t. meines Gefuehls nach sehr gut mit etepetete ueberein.

Auch wenn ich von der Sprachebene, Gebrauch und Intonation etepete als sehr, sehr passen empfinde, spricht nichts dagegen, mehr Eintraege zu ergaenzen. Aber wenn hoity-toity als Uebersetzung fuer eingebildet vorgeschlagen wird, dann wuerde ich mir eine gewisse Kennzeichnung des Sprachgebrauchs fuer h.-t. wuenschen.
---------------
Wie ich schon sagte, habe ich selbst auch nie h.-t. in der Form eines Ausrufs gesehen. Falls korrekt, koennte man es gern als [obs.] kennzeichnen, aber angesichts der Woerterbuchquellen und der im OED zitierten Beispiele, wuerde ich gern auf eine Loeschung dieser - mir vorher unbekannten - obskuren Bedeutung verzichten.
#7AuthorMausling (384473) 09 Apr 08, 16:46
Context/ examples
http://www.dwds.de/?woerterbuch=1&kompakt=1&s...
etepetẹte /Adj./ 〈Herk. unsicher〉 /meist mit sein/ umg. spött. übertrieben eigen, übertrieben fein: sei nicht so e.!; sie benimmt sich e.; »Du wirst doch nicht etepetete sein«, damit nahm er Lenore das Handtäschchen vom Schoß A. Zweig Junge Frau 329

http://www.wissen.de/wde/generator/wissen/res...
etepetete
e|te|pe|te|te [Adj. , o. Steig.; nur mit ”sein“] zimperlich, übertrieben empfindsam, auf Formen haltend [im Niederdeutschen in vielen ähnlichen Formen gebräuchlich, zu öt ”geziert, zimperlich“; wahrscheinlich lautmalende Wortspielerei für zimperliches Gerede mit hoher Stimme]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comment
Oben ein paar deutsche Quellen fuer etepetete. Sie belegen nicht die Konnotation von Arroganz und Hochnaesigkeit, die fuer mich bei etepetete mitschwingt.

Ich stelle meine Einwaende (auch im obigen Beitrag) daher mal aufs Wartegleis.
#8AuthorMausling (384473) 09 Apr 08, 16:52
Comment
Ich wollte mich lieber an die Definitionen halten - frei nach dem Motto: "Just because it sounds good, doesn't make it right."

Ich habe etepetete eigentlich immer so erlebt und empfunden wie in Deinen letzten Definitionen "geziert, zimperlich, auf Formen haltend, übertrieben fein usw." wie auch die englischen Entsprechungen des Oxford-Duden es übersetzen. Für mich fehlt eine eindeutige Konnotation von Arroganz, wie es bei "hoity-toity" der Fall ist.

Als Test, sozusagen, fragte ich heute Abend meinen deutschen Freund: "Wie verhält sich eine Person, die 'etepetete' ist?"
Seine Antwort: "pikiert, affektiert, hochnäsig, arrogant." - Also praktisch alle Definitionen, die ich für "hoity-toity" angeboten habe. Ist das ein Beweis? Ich fragte noch einmal nach, wie stark dabei die Arroganz sei. Daraufhin bestätigte er, dass es in erste Linie "pikiert/affektiert" heiße, daß aber dabei die Arroganz/Hochnäsigkeit als Nuance mitschwinge.

Der Unterschied liegt also in der Stärke dieser Nuancen. Bei "hoity-toity" ist "hochnäsig" die Hauptkonnotation, bei "etepetete" ist das eine Nebenkonnotation. Man kann's so übersetzen, je nach dem, welche Definition gewünscht/gemeint ist. Aber es wird nicht unbedingt in jedem Kontext passen.

As for the originally disputed "Ei, sieh da!" as a translation of hoity-toity as an interjection "used to express astonishment mixed with disapproval and contempt", this is also worth debating. Does the German expression express all of these things? Why is it still in the dictionary (e.g. Cassells 1997) if nobody uses it this way?

I also think that "highty-tighty", being only a variant on the original, should be positioned after "hoity-toity" in the LEO list, if left in at all.
#9AuthorMary nz/a (431018) 10 Apr 08, 01:07
i Only registered users are allowed to post in this forum
 
LEO uses cookies in order to facilitate the fastest possible website experience with the most functions. In some cases cookies from third parties are also used. For further information about this subject please refer to the information under  Leo’s Terms of use / Data protection (Cookies)